With the restrictions necessitated by the COVID-19 pandemic, public events have moved online during the fall of 2020. We hope you enjoy this Humanities Broadsheet — compilation of events organized by or featuring members of the Washington University community, as well as our colleagues in the greater humanities community in the St. Louis area. As you’ll see below, there’s always something going on! 

 

Organizers may submit events to cenhumcal@wustl.edu.

 

Humanities Broadcast

The Humanities Broadcast section spotlights public virtual events featuring WashU faculty and scholars in the humanities and humanistic social sciences, organized by external hosts. If you are a faculty member with an upcoming public lecture, please let us know and we will include it here! Email us at broadcasts@wustl.edu and please include the URL for the event page at your host institution.

 

7 DECEMBER  |  5:30 PM
Jewish American Writing and World Literature: Maybe to Millions, Maybe to Nobody
SAUL ZARITT, former WUSTL Friedman Fellow, will discuss his book with Erin McGlothlin, PhD (Chair and Professor of German) and Nancy Berg, PhD (Professor of Modern Hebrew Languages & Literatures). In his book, Zaritt studies Jewish American writers’ relationships with the idea of world literature. Writers such as Sholem Asch, Jacob Glatstein, Isaac Bashevis Singer, Anna Margolin, Saul Bellow and Grace Paley all responded to a demand to write beyond local Jewish and American audiences and toward the world, as a global market and as a transnational ideal. Jewish American Writing and World Literature tracks the attempts and failures, through translation, to find a home for Jewish vernacularity in the institution of world literature. Department of Jewish, Islamic, and Middle Eastern Studies.
VIRTUAL

WashU Events

1 DECEMBER  |  6 PM
How Latino Voters Decide U.S. Elections
GERALDO CADAVA, associate professor of history, Northwestern University. The Latin American Studies Program Lecture Series on Race and Ethnicity is focused on topics related to the histories, cultures and struggles of racialized populations, from colonial times to the present. Latin American Studies program.
VIRTUAL

2 DECEMBER  |  3 PM
Book Club: The Weight of Ink
Join University Libraries to discuss its December virtual book club selection, The Weight of Ink by Rachel Kadish. Set in London of the 1660s and of the early 21st century, The Weight of Ink is the interwoven tale of two women of remarkable intellect: Ester Velasquez, an emigrant from Amsterdam who is permitted to scribe for a blind rabbi; and Helen Watt, an ailing historian with a love of Jewish history. Book Club will begin with a virtual showcase of rare books from the Shimeon Brisman Collection in Jewish Studies, followed by a discussion of the book. University Libraries.
VIRTUAL – RSVP

2 DECEMBER  |  3 PM
Cyber Security: Where We Are and Where We’re Going
ANDREW MCCABE, former acting and deputy director of the FBI. The Elliot H. Stein Lecture in Ethics will explore how the spread of disinformation is disrupting a vital form of U.S. democracy. After 21 years at the FBI, McCabe has significant experience not only in domestic and international intelligence activities, but also in the realm of cyber security and privacy — two of the most important issues affecting U.S. democracy today. He is a Washington University School of Law alumnus, having earned his juris doctoris in 1993. University Advancement.
VIRTUAL - RSVP

2 DECEMBER  |  6 PM
Dreaming Liberation: Afro-Surrealism and Pop in the 1960s-70s
ABBE SHRIBER, a Tyson Scholar of American Art from Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art. Department of Art History and Archaeology.
VIRTUAL - RSVP

2 DECEMBER  |  6 PM
Katja Perat
Stretching from the Baltic to the Adriatic coast, Winston Churchill’s infamous Iron Curtain is often portrayed as a line on the map, dividing Europe and the world into the Democratic, Developed West and Autocratic, Developing East. Zooming into the cartographic tissue of the Cold War, this talk by Katja Perat, a doctoral candidate in the Comparative Literature program, will take a look at the Iron Curtain not as a dividing non-entity, but as a territory in its own right, marked by a history of an external as well as internalized division stretching from the Enlightenment and into the future. From Milan Kundera’s The Tragedy of Central Europe in the eighties, to the Central European nationalist tragedy of today, this talk will examine how inhabiting the Iron Curtain has shaped the processes of subject- and nation-building in this invisible borderland. Sam Fox School, Washington University.
VIRTUAL – RSVP

2 DECEMBER  |  7 PM
Getting It Together Before It’s Too Late: Building Solidarity Across Race and Class
Ian Haney Lopez, the Chief Justice Earl Warren Professor of Public Law and director, Racial Politics Project, Haas Institute for a Fair and Inclusive Society, University of California, Berkeley School of Law. Lopez is one of the nation's leading experts on how race relations have evolved since the civil rights era. He has authored a number of books, scholarly articles and media contributions, including this recent op-ed in the New York Times: https://www.nytimes.com/2020/09/18/opinion/biden-latino-vote-strategy.html. Barbara & Michael Newmark Endowed Sociology Lecture on Pluralism..
VIRTUAL – RSVP

3 DECEMBER  |  12 PM
Idle Hands: How Windows Solitaire Invented Modern Computing
IAN BOGOST, the Ivan Allen College Distinguished Chair in Media Studies and professor of interactive computing at the Georgia Institute of Technology. Imagining Digital Transformations in the Humanities. Center for the Humanities.
VIRTUAL

3 DECEMBER  |  6 PM
Defining a Comic Tradition: Plautus and the Marx Brothers
JOHN GRUBER-MILLER, the Edwin R. and Mary E. Mason Professor of Languages at Cornell College. Critics of comedy have generally classified the Marx Brothers as anarchists or as ethnic comedians or as members of a larger comedian tradition. None of these designations gives the Marx Brothers their due. In fact, these labels reduce their films to witty bits rather than take their entire comic world into consideration. In examining their success at creating this distinctive comic world, it becomes clear that the Marx Brothers are part of a long tradition going all the way back to the Roman comic playwright Plautus, best known for his tricky slaves, verbal pyrotechnics, actors’ rapport with the audience and send-ups of romantic comedy. Department of Classics.
VIRTUAL

3 DECEMBER  |  6 PM
Eric Mumford
ERIC MUMFORD, the Rebecca and John Voyles Professor of Architecture, Washington University, will discuss Josep Lluís Sert: The Architect of Urban Design. Josep Lluís Sert (1902–83) was a Barcelona architect and leader of the Spanish CIAM (International Congresses for Modern Architecture) group, where he strongly supported the Spanish Republic in the Spanish Civil War 1936–39. After fleeing Fascist Spain in 1939, he moved to New York, Sert designed many urban plans for various Latin American cities from 1944-58, most of them unbuilt. He was also appointed dean of the Harvard University Graduate School of Design from 1953 to 1969, where he introduced the discipline of urban design to the curriculum, which then had global impact. Beginning in the late 1950s, his firm Sert, Jackson designed major campus buildings in the Boston metro area and near Toronto, Canada, as well as many other works, such as the Eastgate housing on Roosevelt Island in New York City (1970). Sam Fox School.
VIRTUAL - RSVP

4 DECEMBER  |  2 PM
Annual Display of Rare Anatomical Texts
Becker Library’s Archives and Rare Books Division will host the Annual Display of Rare Anatomical Texts for the first time in virtual format this year. This popular annual exhibition is a unique opportunity to see a selection of spectacular medical works dating from the Renaissance to the 20th century up close. Some highlights of the Becker rare book collections include first and second editions of Andreas Vesalius’ landmark work De humani corporis fabrica, which is credited as being the foundation of modern anatomy; Govard Bidloo’s Ontleding des menschelyken lichaams, known for the harsh sense of realism it brought to illustrating the process of dissection; and Siegfried Albinus’ massive Tabluae sceleti et musculorum corporis humani, with its illustrations of skeletons and skinned musclemen posing against elaborate backgrounds. Becker Medical Library.
VIRTUAL

4 DECEMBER  |  3 PM
Opacity, Rézonans, Biguidi: Music and Dance as Decolonial Praxis in the French Caribbean
JÉRÔME CAMAL, assistant professor of anthropology, University of Wisconsin-Madison. To what extent can music and dance support decolonial transformation in the face of ongoing (post)colonial duress? Born from the French Caribbean crucible, Guadeloupean gwoka has always-already been a music and dance practice both of and against colonialism. In the 20th century, gwoka became the cultural weapon of anticolonial activists. Today, even as dreams of independence recede in the collective political imaginary, gwoka continues to provide an embodied practice through which many Guadeloupeans confront their position as postcolonial, non-sovereign, citizens of the French imperial state. Based on over a decade of dancing and playing music alongside Guadeloupeans on both sides of the Atlantic, this presentation outlines the potential and limits of gwoka as an embodied, decolonial, epistemology. Foregrounding the importance of technique, Jérôme Camal asks, What kind of knowledge does music carry? Can this knowledge counteract centuries of colonial assimilation? How do structures of power shape who has access to this knowledge and, importantly, what are the implications for a decolonial anthropology? Department of Music.
VIRTUAL - RSVP

4 DECEMBER  |  4 PM
To Be on the One: Worldmaking in the Global Hip Hop Cypher
IMANI KAI JOHNSON is an interdisciplinary-trained assistant professor of critical dance studies at the University of California, Riverside. Her research focuses on Africanist aesthetics, global popular culture, and ritual and social streetdance cultures; while her teaching focus is on the political stakes and socio-cultural possibilities of ritual land social dancing. Johnson is completing her manuscript, “Dark Matter in Breaking Cyphers: Africanist Aesthetics in Global Hip Hop” with Oxford University Press, a work on the embedded Africanist aesthetics in ritual cyphers and the epistemological implications of its global reach. Performing Arts Department.
VIRTUAL

5 DECEMBER  |  11 AM
Myths of the Orient: Deconstructing the European Vision of the Middle East
Join Eve Rosekind, a PhD student in the Department of Art History & Archaeology in Arts & Sciences, for a talk about Orientalism, the artistic representation of the Middle East by European artists. The most common subjects of orientalist artwork that emerged in the 19th century were the desert landscape, hunters and warriors, market scenes, and odalisques in harems. These orientalist themes continued throughout the 20th century, demonstrating the longevity of Orientalism within the history of art. Initially these Orientalist artworks appear as beautiful and straightforward representations of their subject matter, but the ideas that underlie these artistic depictions stem from European histories of colonialism and empire. This talk will scrutinize the common artistic themes of Orientalism and how they constructed a specific European vision and fantasy of the Orient. The Kemper Art Museum’s collection of paintings, photographs, and works on paper will take participants on a journey through the complex themes of European Orientalism. Kemper Art Museum.
VIRTUAL - RSVP

9 DECEMBER  |  1 PM
How Your ZIP Code Impacts Your Future
Join alumni and friends for a conversation moderated by Tom Hillman, AB ’78, University Trustee and Chair of Brown School National Council. The panel will include Washington University experts Mary McKay, PhD, Neidorff Family and Centene Corporation Dean of the Brown School, Matthew Kreuter, PhD, Kahn Family Professor of Public Health, and Jason Purnell, PhD, MPH, Vice President of Community Health Improvement at BJC HealthCare as they discuss health disparities across communities and how something as simple as a zip code can indicate future well-being and life expectancy. Panelists will explain that where you live matters and how current research is being used to help meet the needs of the most vulnerable communities and to help inform the best outcomes. Washington University Alumni Association and George Warren Brown School of Social Work.
VIRTUAL - RSVP

9 DECEMBER  |  7 PM
Katja Perat
KATJA PERAT, a PhD student in comparative literature and member of the International Writers Track in the Comparative Literature program, will present her new novel The Masochist (translated from the Slovenian by Michael Biggins) in a virtual reading and discussion with Lynne Tatlock, director of the Program in Comparative Literature, Washington University. Perat’s novel, The Masochist, is a serio-comical fictional romp through the Habsburg Empire of the fin de siècle, beginning in 1874 Lemberg (present day Lviv/Lvov in Ukraine), continuing to Vienna, and ending in the Habsburg Adriatic seaport of Trieste in 1912. Along the way, the protagonist, Nadezhda Moser, the daughter of Leopold von Sacher-Masoch (notorious author of Venus in Furs), encounters luminaries of the Empire’s cultural elite. International Writers Series, a new collaboration between the International Writers track of the Program of Comparative Literature and the University Libraries.
VIRTUAL - RSVP

11 DECEMBER  |  10 AM
David Diop on his book Frère d'âme (in French)
Born in Paris in 1966, David Diop spent most of his childhood in Senegal before returning to France for his studies. In 1998, he became professor of 18th century French and Francophone literature at the Université de Pau. In 2018, he won the prestigious Prix Goncourt des lycéens for his first novel. About the book: One fateful morning of World War I, Captain Armand orders an attack on the German enemy. The soldiers rush forward. Among the ranks are Seneganese riflement Alfa Ndiaye and Mademba Diop, two of the many men who fought under the French flag. Shortly after springing from the trench, Mademba falls, fatally wounded in front of his lifelong friend, Alfa, practically his brother. Alfa finds himself alone in the madness of the great massacre with no sense of purpose. Detached from everything, including himself, he spreads violence, sowing terror to the point of frightening his comrades. His evacuation to the rear is the prelude to a remembrance of his past in Africa, a whole world lost and resurrected, whose convocation is the ultimate and splendid resistance to the first butchery of the modern era. Conversation with Lionel Cuillé, director of French ConneXions, followed by a Q/A. We encourage you to read the book in French in advance: https://www.seuil.com/ouvrage/frere-d-ame-david-diop/9782021398243. French ConneXions Webinar Series, Department of Romance Languages and Literatures.
VIRTUAL - RSVP

11 DECEMBER  |  7 PM
Remember...That Time Before the Last Time
Remember is an exploration of the effects of race, social injustice and the traumatic impact of slavery on the creative impulses of a people/artists through spoken word, music and dance from the diaspora. Our lens focuses on survival from 1619 to 2020. Conceived and directed by Ron Himes; choreographed by Heather Beal. After the premiere this production will be available on-demand thru December 27, 2020. This production is offered as an on-demand virtual event. Please see event page for details on donating via the Performing Arts Department’s “Pay What You Can” link. Performing Arts Department.
ON-DEMAND

13 DECEMBER  |  2 PM
Public Tour: Human Forms
Student educators design and lead virtual tours featuring several artworks in the Kemper Art Museum collection or in special exhibitions, showing images of the artworks through screen sharing and answering participant questions. Nina Huang (Sam Fox School ’22) considers several works from across the collection in which the human form plays a prominent role. This hour-long tour is free, but registration is required. Kemper Art Museum.
VIRTUAL - RSVP

18 DECEMBER–3 JANUARY 
Washington University Dance Theatre: Aperture
A “Dance for Camera” film festival premiering December 18, 2020 at 7 pm and streaming on-demand thru January 3, 2021. An “aperture” is defined as “the space through which light enters a camera” and “an opening, hole or gap…”  In the time of COVID, we will not be able to perform dance in theaters for live audiences, and this feels like a big loss. But for artists, challenging times also create openings in which we adapt and respond creatively to try something new, in the “gap.” This is the lens through which we let our light shine. For the first time, Washington University Dance Theatre will be presented as a “Dance for Camera” film festival of new works by resident choreographers, performed by student dancers of the Performing Arts Department.
ON DEMAND

18 DECEMBER  |  12 PM
Public Tour: House and Home
Student educators design and lead virtual tours featuring several artworks in the Kemper Art Museum collection or in special exhibitions, showing images of the artworks through screen sharing and answering participant questions. Jay Buchannan (Arts & Sciences ’21) shares artworks in the collection that depict domestic spaces and explore the many meanings of home. The program will include live closed captions in English. This hour-long tour is free, but registration is required. Kemper Art Museum.
VIRTUAL - RSVP

7 JANUARY  |  5 PM
Saint Louis Art Museum Exhibition Virtual Tour: Currents 118: Elias Sime
Join the Saint Louis Art Museum’s associate curator of modern and contemporary art, Hannah Klemm, and curatorial research assistant, Molly Moog, AB ’12, for a presentation of highlights from SLAM’s current exhibition, Currents 118: Elias Sime. Klemm and Moog will discuss the work of important Ethiopian artist Elias Sime (b. 1968). For over a decade, Sime has created large-scale, modular artworks from discarded technological materials such as electrical wires, circuit boards, motherboards and computer keys. Sime sources his materials from the Merkato in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, the biggest open-air market in Africa, where hundreds of vendors sell objects passed down a long line of global trade. These materials, as well as his artworks, tell a story of globalization and an interconnected world. His projects transform formerly functional items into something new, transcending their original utilitarian purpose. University Advancement.
VIRTUAL - RSVP

St. Louis Community Events

1 DECEMBER  |  11 AM
STL History Live: Our River Conversation: Protecting the River
Do laws adequately protect rivers? Who speaks for the rivers? In what ways is caring for this valuable resource and the confluence region disconnected from natural river functions? This discussion will examine how our region’s rivers have been protected through policy and legislation, and we’ll also explore what legal environmental protection of the river might look like — including how we play a part as citizens. Elizabeth Hubertz, director of the Interdisciplinary Environmental Clinic at Washington University, will give a practical examination of issues with laws that govern the Mississippi River and their applications. Eric T. Freyfogle, research professor and Swanlund Chair Emeritus at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, will provide an ecological-systems-based view of the river, including how our ownership biases shape our evaluation of it. Missouri History Museum.
VIRTUAL

1 DECEMBER  |  6 PM
Blackness and Anti-Blackness in American Public Life
Blackness has been (and continues to be) under attack globally, but particularly within our country. As we begin to grapple with some of the wider ranging and material effects of racism, particularly anti-Blackness, three scholars — Lisa M. Corrigan, Alfred L. Martin, Jr. and Anjali Vats — will hold a joint book talk to chart cultural histories of Blackness through law, politics and media. St. Louis Public Library.
VIRTUAL - RSVP

2–30 DECEMBER  |  1 PM
Soldiers Memorial Outdoor Tours
Explore the architecture and history of the Soldiers Memorial Military Museum and the Court of Honor while learning of their role in the beautification of downtown St. Louis. This is an opportunity to better understand the symbolism and nuances of Soldiers Memorial’s massive Walker Hancock sculptures, spectacular Gold Star Mothers mosaic, calming effects of its reflecting pool and fountain and many other architectural tributes to those who served our country. Meet your guide outside near the main entrance to the building for the 1-hour tour. Tours are free, but registration is required. Missouri Historical Society.
IN PERSON: Soldiers Memorial Military Museum, 1315 Chestnut St, St. Louis, 63103

3 DECEMBER  |  12 PM 
Art Speaks: Expressionism Explained
If you’ve ever wondered what is German Expressionism, then join Melissa Venator, the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Fellow for Modern Art, as she explores its intriguing artists, international roots and enduring legacy through the lens of paintings currently on view in the permanent collection galleries and in the special exhibition Storm of Progress: German Art after 1800 from the Saint Louis Art Museum. Saint Louis Art Museum.
VIRTUAL - RSVP

3 DECEMBER  |  6 PM
Holiday Food History
In this themed program, Magdalene Linck, library assistant (and food lover), will delve into the library’s rich collection of cookbooks and menus to explore the tastes and traditions of holidays past. We’ll explore the differences and similarities between holiday celebrations for St. Louis’ working class and immigrant groups and the upper echelons of St. Louis society. We’ll look at the sweet and savory side of the holidays — from cookies and novelty desserts to extravagant year-end feasts. There may even be a re-creation of a holiday treat. Bring your appetite (or a snack) and your holiday spirit! Missouri History Museum.
VIRTUAL

4 DECEMBER  |  4 –5 PM
First Friday
Take a virtual walk through Rachel Youn’s exhibition, Gather, which is part of the Great Rivers Biennial 2020. Youn (BFA 2017, Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts) transforms materials found on Craigslist and Facebook Marketplace — electric massagers, artificial plants, speaker cabinets — into kinetic sculptures that dance with joy and thrash in agony. She talks with CAM Assistant Curator Misa Jeffereis, who organized the GRB. Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis.
VIRTUAL

4 DECEMBER  |  6:30 PM
STL History Live: Segregation and the City: What Happened Next?
The third installment of our annual symposium catches up with Nneka N’namdi, founder of Fight Blight Bmore; Molly Metzger of Washington University in St. Louis; Tyrone Turner of Better Family Life; and Jacob Wagner, University of Kansas City Center for Neighborhoods to see how each organization has navigated the current pandemic and the effects that this international crisis has had on the communities they represent. Missouri History Museum.
VIRTUAL

4 DECEMBER  |  7 PM
See STL: Whole Lotta (STL) History
Want to walk the 1860s riverfront with us? How about checking out a giant roller coaster on Delmar, or visiting the Zoo’s bear pits up on North Grand? Time travel through 250+ years of St. Louis history, finding big history hiding in plain sight! See STL virtual tours are conducted via Zoom and last approximately 90 minutes. $10–$15. Missouri History Museum.
VIRTUAL

5 DECEMBER  |  11:30 AM
The Double Pandemic: Can You Hear Me?
Explore the overlapping pandemics of COVID-19, systemic racism and income inequality in this series of 10-minute virtual plays inspired by the real-life experiences of people in the St. Louis region and beyond. Classmates are meeting about a school project, but each student faces a unique challenge due to circumstances made more difficult by the pandemic. Can the group of teens find balance amid unreliable internet connections, childcare responsibilities and part-time jobs as essential workers in time to complete their project? The play will be followed by a short question-and-answer session. Teens Make History Series, Missouri Historical Society’s Teens Make History Players in collaboration with Metro Theater Company.
VIRTUAL

8 DECEMBER  |  11 AM
STL History Live: Drawing History with Rori
St. Louis–based artist Rori brought the women of the Beyond the Ballot exhibit to life with her eye-catching graphic illustrations. Join Rori! on a virtual visit to the exhibit, where she’ll discuss how she approached these depictions, the challenges she faced and what she learned along the way. A Q&A and art demonstration will follow. Missouri History Museum.
VIRTUAL

10 DECEMBER  |  6:30 PM
STL History Live: Human Rights Day
Join us for our annual observation of international Human Rights Day. This program will examine how the Universal Declaration of Human Rights continues to affect our lives, with a particular focus on the St. Louis region. Missouri History Museum.
VIRTUAL

11 DECEMBER  |  7 PM
See STL: STL Underground
We can finally answer yes when people ask us if we lead St. Louis cave tours! It’s true that they’re virtual, but at least there won’t be any bats to contend with. St. Louis Underground will explore more than just caves: We’ll also wind our way through sewers, sinkholes, train tunnels, rivers, bunkers and mine shafts. Join us to learn all about the history hiding right beneath your feet! See STL virtual tours are conducted via Zoom and last approximately 90 minutes. $10–$15. Missouri Historical Museum.
VIRTUAL

12 DECEMBER  |  11:30 AM
The Double Pandemic: Saying Goodbye
Explore the overlapping pandemics of COVID-19, systemic racism, and income inequality in this series of 10-minute virtual plays inspired by the real-life experiences of people in the St. Louis region and beyond. The pandemic has brought loss in many forms, and the emotions caused by instability and the death of a loved one can be difficult to manage. In this short play, a group of teenagers do their best to come to terms with their feelings of sadness and anger while having to stay distanced from friends and loved ones. The play will be followed by a short question-and-answer session. Teens Make History Series, Missouri Historical Society’s Teens Make History Players in collaboration with Metro Theater Company.
VIRTUAL

15 DECEMBER  |  7 PM
Jane Smiley, Perestroika in Paris (Author Talk)
Perestroika in Paris is a captivating, brilliantly imaginative story of three extraordinary animals — and a young boy — whose lives intersect in Paris. Jane Smiley captures the creativity, ingenuity and desire of all creatures for true love and freedom. St. Louis County Library.
VIRTUAL

16 DECEMBER  |  12 PM
Drawing from Observation
In a twist on sharpening drawing skills, this special program invites viewpoints from outside of the artist’s studio. In this online edition, CAM museum educator José Garza talks with a local architect about perspective drawing. Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis.
VIRTUAL

16 DECEMBER  |  12 PM
Soldiers Chow and Chat: Martial Arts and U.S. Armed Forces
All branches of the U.S. Armed Forces rely on different kinds of hand-to-hand combat training. Join this conversation between Soldiers Memorial Director Mark Sundlov and martial artist Kunaal Bajwa as they discuss these many disciplines. Bajwa is trained in the martial arts of Kali, Silat and Jeet Kune Do, and he’s skilled in using sticks, knives, staff, sarong, grappling and kickboxing techniques that have their roots in Southeast Asia. Soldiers Memorial Military Museum.
VIRTUAL

19 DECEMBER  |  11:30 AM
The Double Pandemic: But What Can I Do?
Explore the overlapping pandemics of COVID-19, systemic racism, and income inequality in this series of 10-minute virtual plays inspired by the real-life experiences of people in the St. Louis region and beyond. Sometimes people have to make difficult decisions, and the right course of action isn’t always clear. Follow along as a group of friends tries to decide whether to go out to a protest, and explore other ways that people can take action to stand up against inequality and injustice. The play will be followed by a short question-and-answer session. Teens Make History Series, Missouri Historical Society’s Teens Make History Players in collaboration with Metro Theater Company.
VIRTUAL

27 DECEMBER  |  2 PM
The Silenced Walls Screening & Discussion
In the Parisian suburb of Drancy lies an unadorned block of low-income housing. This documentary explores the building that in 1940 became the central internment camp for Jews during the Nazi occupation of France. Nearly every Jew arrested in France came through its austere lodgings, most on their way to Auschwitz. French with English subtitles. Introductory remarks and post-screening discussion facilitated by Zvi Tannenbaum, former professor of history at Missouri Southern State University in Joplin. He is also a founding member of the Holocaust Educators and Academic Roundtable of the Midwest Center for Holocaust Education in Kansas City. Register online. For more information, call 314-442-3711 or email LCooper@JFedSTL.org. Holocaust Museum and Learning Center.
IN PERSON: St. Louis County Library, 1640 S. Lindbergh Blvd., Ladue, 63131

13 JANUARY  |  6 PM
In the Studio: Rachel Youn
Join Great Rivers Biennial 2020 award-winner Rachel Youn online as they talk about the transformation of everyday found objects into kinetic sculptures and conceptually based art. Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis.
VIRTUAL

19 JANUARY  |  2–3 PM; 6–7  PM
St. Louis County Library’s New on View Tour of CAM
The St. Louis County Library hosts a series of free, virtual tours with local curators in the program New on View. You’re invited to join CAM Assistant Curator Misa Jeffereis for an interactive tour of the Contemporary Art Museum’s main galleries, featuring Great Rivers Biennial 2020: Kahlil Robert Irving, Tim Portlock, and Rachel Youn and Ebony G. Patterson: …when the cuts erupt…the garden rings…and the warning is a wailing… using video and installation images of the artworks. Jeffereis provides special insights into the artwork and the artists. Two tours are available. St. Louis County Library.
VIRTUAL

20 JANUARY  |  7 PM
George Saunders, A Swim in the Pond in the Rain (Author Talk)
Left Bank Books welcomes award-winning author George Saunders, who will discuss what makes great stories work and what they can tell us about ourselves and our world today. For the last 20 years, George Saunders has been teaching a class on the Russian short story to his MFA students at Syracuse University. In A Swim in a Pond in the Rain, he shares a version of that class with us, offering some of what he and his students have discovered together over the years. Paired with iconic short stories by Chekhov, Turgenev, Tolstoy and Gogol, the seven essays in this book are intended for anyone interested in how fiction works and why it’s more relevant than ever in these turbulent times. He approaches the stories technically yet accessibly, and through them explains how narrative functions; why we stay immersed in a story and why we resist it; and the bedrock virtues a writer must foster. The process of writing, Saunders reminds us, is a technical craft, but also a way of training oneself to see the world with new openness and curiosity. A Swim in a Pond in the Rain is a deep exploration not just of how great writing works but of how the mind itself works while reading, and of how the reading and writing of stories make genuine connection possible. Book purchase required. Left Bank Books.
VIRTUAL