With the restrictions necessitated by the COVID-19 pandemic, public events have moved online during the spring of 2021. We hope you enjoy this Humanities Broadsheet — compilation of events organized by or featuring members of the Washington University community, as well as our colleagues in the greater humanities community in the St. Louis area. As you’ll see below, there’s always something going on! 

 

Organizers may submit events to cenhumcal@wustl.edu.

 

Humanities Broadcast

The Humanities Broadcast section spotlights public virtual events featuring WashU faculty and scholars in the humanities and humanistic social sciences, organized by external hosts. If you are a faculty member with an upcoming public lecture, please let us know and we will include it here! Email us at broadcasts@wustl.edu and please include the URL for the event page at your host institution.

 

9 MARCH  |  6 PM
Conversation: Environmental Racism and the Arts
This discussion focuses on environmental racism, social justice and the arts. It brings together artist-in-residence Jordan Weber, Des Moines-based multi-disciplinary artist; Michael Allen, senior lecturer in architecture, landscape architecture and urban design in the Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts at Washington University; Inez Bordeaux, organizer for Close the Workhouse and manager of community collaborations at ArchCity Defenders; and Geoff Ward, professor of African and African-American studies at Washington University. Weber is currently an artist-in-residence in a collaborative project by the Center for the Study of Race, Ethnicity and Equity (CRE2) and the Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts at Washington University and the Pulitzer Arts Foundation. Weber’s St. Louis residency focuses on social and environmental justice, incarceration and healing with a specific focus on the Close the Workhouse campaign. Co-sponsored by Emily Rauh Pulitzer and the Sam Fox School.
VIRTUAL – RSVP

10 MARCH  |  6 PM
Virtual Book Launch for Rarities of These Lands: Art, Trade, and Diplomacy in the Dutch Republic
Join us for a virtual book launch of Rarities of these Lands: Art, Trade and Diplomacy in the Dutch Republic (Princeton University Press), authored by Claudia Swan, the inaugural Mark Steinberg Weil Professor of Art History and Archaeology at Washington University. This event will feature a conversation between Swan and Larry Silver, the Farquhar Professor Emeritus of History of Art at University of Pennsylvania. Department of Art History and Archaeology.
VIRTUAL – RSVP

 

 

 

11 MARCH  |  4 PM 
The Seventh Seal
The Screening Contagion Film Series invites you to view four pandemic films, then attend a series of panel discussions with faculty drawn from a variety of disciplines. How might these films help us understand pandemics in the past, present and future? How does our own pandemic moment inform how we view these films? Join us for a panel discussion of Ingmar Bergman’s The Seventh Seal (1957). A man seeks answers about life, death and the existence of God as he plays chess against the Grim Reaper during the Black Plague. Panelists include Christine Johnson, associate professor of history; Jen Arch, senior lecturer in English; and Christina Ramos, assistant professor of history. All panelists are from Washington University. Screening Contagion Film Series, Center for the Humanities.
VIRTUAL – RSVP

16 MARCH  |  11 AM
The Fruits of Empire: A Book Talk About Art, Food and Racism
Join us for a virtual conversation featuring Shana Klein, AB ’05, author of The Fruits of Empire: Art, Food and the Politics of Race in the Age of American Expansion. Angela Miller, professor of art history and archaeology at Washington University, will moderate the event. Still-life paintings of food look innocent at first sight. Pictures of bowls bulging with oranges and grapes were fashionable in American dining rooms, but were fruits merely delicious gems in pretty pictures to admire? The Fruits of Empire argues otherwise. This book talk will discuss Klein’s research on representations of food to understand how they reflected and shaped conversations about race and national expansion in the United States. In a moderated discussion, Klein will discuss the paintings, photographs and silverware objects in her book and ask: Who do images of food serve? And at whose expense? The results are not always delicious. Klein is an assistant professor of art history at Kent State University and historian of American art. She holds a doctorate in art history from the University of New Mexico. University Advancement.
VIRTUAL - RSVP

WashU Events

1 MARCH  |  11:30 AM
Human Centered Computing Approaches to Issues of Social Justice
ERIC CORBETT is currently a postdoctoral researcher at New York University’s Center for Urban Science and Progress. His background is in computer science and human-computer interaction. He has worked on projects across various subjects including resisting and countering gentrification; supporting trust in civic relationships between local government officials and marginalized communities; and, most recently, creating new opportunities for democratic participation in public sector algorithm use. Throughout his research, the overarching thread has been exploring the intersections between design, social justice, democracy and technology. Department of Computer Science & Engineering.
VIRTUAL - RSVP

1 MARCH  |  6 PM
Lina Bo Bardi Draws: Pictures at an Exhibition
ZEULER LIMA is an associate professor at the Sam Fox School. Lima is the author of the acclaimed biography Lina Bo Bardi, about the Italian-born Brazilian architect (Yale University Press, 2013) with several worldwide lectures and deferential reviews, including in The New York Review of Books. He has contributed extensively to national and international journals, museum catalogues and book editions and is co-editing a forthcoming anthology of texts by architects from Latin America for the Museum of Modern Art (New York). Architecture Faculty Lecture, Sam Fox School.
VIRTUAL - RSVP

1 MARCH  |  6:30 PM
Meaningfulness: A Third Dimension of the Good Life
SUSAN WOLF, the Edna J. Koury Distinguished Professor, Department of Philosophy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. In thinking about what we want for ourselves and for those about whom we care, we tend to think in terms of the categories of self-interest and morality. We want, in other words, to be both happy and good. These categories, however, leave something out: an interest that our lives be meaningful. Wolf proposes an analysis of meaningfulness in terms of subjective engagement with objective values. Understanding meaningfulness this way brings together the attractive elements of other more popular ways of thinking about the concept and makes intelligible why we should care deeply about having meaning in our lives. Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar Lecture, Arts & Sciences.
VIRTUAL – RSVP

1 MARCH  |  7 PM
Angry at Moses: Israel’s Quest for Oil Since 1948
Securing reliable oil imports has been a top national security priority for Israeli decision makers since the country’s establishment. How did Israel manage to obtain oil supplies during numerous embargos, and how did this shape its foreign policy and global weapons trade? Elai Rettig is the Israeli Institute Teaching Fellow in Israeli and Environmental Studies at Washington University. In this three-part study, Rettig will explore the interplay between energy security and foreign policy in Israel from 1948 to the present. This lecture is the first of a three-part series. Virtual Israeli Center Series, Department of Jewish, Islamic, and Middle Eastern Studies.
VIRTUAL – RSVP

2 MARCH  |  12:30 PM
Poorly Understood: What America Gets Wrong About Poverty
The idealized image of American society is one of abundant opportunities, with hard work being rewarded by economic prosperity. But what if this picture is wrong? What if poverty is an experience that touches the majority of Americans? Join Mark Rank, the Herbert S. Hadley Professor of Social Welfare at Washington University’s Brown School, for a discussion regarding his latest book Poorly Understood, which systematically addresses and confronts many of the most widespread myths pertaining to poverty. Brown School Open Classroom.
VIRTUAL - RSVP

4 MARCH  |  4 PM
Paris Past and Present
MEREDITH COHEN, associate professor of art history at UCLA, will present her ongoing digital project Paris Past and Present, which aims to reconstruct lost monuments of medieval Paris with interactive 3-D models. Grisby Lecture, Department of Romance Languages and Literatures.
VIRTUAL – RSVP

5 MARCH  |  4 PM
Kinship Novels of Early Modern Korea: Between Genealogical Time and the Domestic Everyday
KSENIA CHIZHOVA is assistant professor of Korean literature and cultural studies at Princeton University. Violence and bloody family feuds constitute the core of the so-called lineage novels (kamun sosŏl) that circulated in Chosŏn Korea from the late 17th to the early 20th century. Such subject matter becomes ever more puzzling when we consider that the main audience for these texts were elite women of Korea, who were subjected to exacting comportment standards and domestic discipline. Coeval with the rise and fall of Korean patrilineal kinship, these texts depict the genealogical subject — emotional self socialized through the structures of prescriptive kinship, but kinship itself is treated as a series of conflicts between genders and generations. This talk will contextualize lineage novels and the domestic world in which they were read within the patrilineal transformation of the Chosŏn society and the emergence of elite vernacular Korean culture, patronaged by elite women. The proliferation of kinship narratives in the Chosŏn period illuminates the changing affective contours of familial bonds and how the domestic space functioned as a site of their everyday experience. Drawing on an archive of women-centered elite vernacular texts, this talk uncovers the structures of feelings and conceptions of selfhood beneath official genealogies and legal statutes, revealing that kinship is as much a textual as a social practice. East Asian Studies Program.
VIRTUAL - RSVP

6 MARCH  |  11 AM
Artist Talk with Christine Sun Kim
California-born, Berlin-based artist Christine Sun Kim explores concepts of sound, its visual representations, and how it is valued by society, from her perspective as part of the Deaf community. She uses performance, video, drawing, writing and sound installation to uncover the depth and complexity of communication, including the politics of voice, listening and language. Kim will discuss her new site-specific mural in the Kemper Art Museum’s atrium, Stacking Traumas, and its relation to her work with American Sign Language, musical notation, televisual captioning and other systems of visual communication to address the intricacies of social exchange and the power of representation. Stacking Traumas is virtually accessible on the museum’s website. The program will include ASL interpretation by Denise Kahler and live closed captions. In Conversation Lecture Series, Kemper Art Museum.
VIRTUAL - RSVP

8 MARCH  |  6 PM
Empire of Eloquence: The Classical Tradition in the Early Modern Hispanic World
How did ancient Mediterranean rhetoric, law and culture shape life in the early modern Hispanic world? To answer this question, Stuart M. McManus, assistant professor of pre-modern world history at Chinese University of Hong Kong, will explore the role of the classical tradition in structuring and disseminating Hispanic discourses on empire, slavery and Christian missions, with a particular focus on the ways ancient literary forms and civic practices (from the epigram to Ciceronian public speaking) were then appropriated by ethnically Iberian, indigenous and African students of antiquity to carve out a place for themselves within this hierarchical global space. By taking a global and intersectional approach to classical reception studies, this talk makes the case that the global impact of Greece and Rome cannot be understood without reference to historically specific constructions of race, gender and class. McManus is a Latinist and scholar of the classical tradition in global and multiethnic context, with a particular focus on the reception of ancient Mediterranean culture in Latin America, Asia, Africa and among people of color in the United States. He has also published on Roman law, slavery, indigenous-language philology and contemporary Latinx culture. These interests form part of a larger intellectual project to uncover the complex role played by Greco-Roman Antiquity in non-Western contexts and to engage students who have been traditionally underrepresented in the field. Department of Classics.
VIRTUAL - RSVP

8 MARCH  |  7 PM
Peace Pipelines or Energy Wars? Israel Gas Politics in the Mediterranean Sea
Major offshore natural-gas discoveries in 2010 created many economic and foreign policy opportunities for Israel but also set in motion a series of escalating clashes between the countries of the region. Elai Rettig, the Israeli Institute Teaching Fellow in Israeli and Environmental Studies at Washington University, will discuss the politics over gas production and gas exports in the East Mediterranean Sea, and examine what options Israel has in the near future. In this three-part study, Rettig will explore the interplay between energy security and foreign policy in Israel from 1948 to the present. This lecture is the second of a three-part series. Virtual Israeli Center Series, Department of Jewish, Islamic, and Middle Eastern Studies.
VIRTUAL - RSVP

8 MARCH  |  7 PM
Henry L. and Natalie E. Freund Teaching Fellow Lecture: Dana Levy
Israeli-born, New York–based artist Dana Levy, recipient of the 2019–20 Henry L. and Natalie E. Freund Teaching Fellowship, will join Saint Louis Art Museum curator Hannah Klemm for a conversation about Levy’s Currents 119 exhibition. The exhibition explores how humans interact with historic architecture and highlights disparities between what we expect of architecture and urban planning and the real, nuanced histories of the built environment. Kemper Art Museum.
VIRTUAL - RSVP

10 MARCH  |  11 AM
“France is back!”: Disruption et continuité de la diplomatie culturelle aux Etats-Unis en temps de pandémie
Join us for a virtual roundtable (in French) with Gaëtan Bruel, cultural counselor of the French Embassy in the United States; and Louise Quantin, cultural attachée, head of the Books & Ideas Department, Cultural Services of the French Embassy in the U.S. This roundtable is moderated by Lionel Cuillé, a teaching professor of French at Washington University. Department of Romance Languages and Literature.
VIRTUAL

10 MARCH  |  11:30 AM
Architectural History as a Global Discipline
The featured panelists will explore several questions: What does it mean for a historian to be global? What are the blind spots in achieving a truly global architectural history? What are the main lessons of global architectural histories that have been written in the last 20 years? What will be the impact of the current pandemic and social unrests on the notion of “global”? The panelists include Mark Jarzombek, a professor in the History and Theory of Architecture program at Massachusetts Institute of Technology; Kathleen James-Chakraborty, a professor of art history at University College Dublin; Zeynep Çelik Alexander, an architectural historian who teaches at the Department of Art History and Archaeology at Columbia University; and Tao Zhu, an associate professor and deputy head of the Department of Architecture and co-director of the Center for Chinese Architecture and Urban Design at University of Hong Kong. Discussions Series, Sam Fox School.
VIRTUAL - RSVP

10 MARCH  |  6 PM
Farmworkers in the Visual Field: Racial Capitalism and Farmworker Representation
Extrapolating from his book Farm Worker Futurism: Speculative Technologies of Resistance, Curtis Marez — a professor of ethnic studies at the University of California, San Diego, the former editor of American Quarterly, and the former president of the American Studies Association — will analyze struggles in the visual field between California agribusiness and farm workers of color. Agribusiness has historically used cameras to surveil and control workers, while farm worker unions have employed cameras to imagine better worlds and project different, more egalitarian social orders. Understood in this way, the visual field of agricultural production in California is an important site where farm workers oppose forms of racial capitalism. Marez will draw on Cedric J. Robinson’s theorization of racial capitalism in Forgeries of Memory and Meaning: Blacks and the Regimes of Race in American Theater and Film Before World War II (2007), where he argued that racist film representations rationalized the exploitation of workers of color and encouraged racism among white workers. Films vilifying people of color, Robinson concluded, normalized the disciplining of Black and Latinx labor and encouraged white racism to the benefit of finance capitalists who were also invested in the film industry. While Robinson focused on commercial films, Marez will use his ideas to analyze agribusiness and especially union made visual culture (including photography, painting, posters, theater, and marches) as weapons in battles between capitalists and farm workers. Marez is the author of Drug Wars: The Political Economy of Narcotics (University of Minnesota Press, 2004); Farm Worker Futurism: Speculative Technologies of the Resistance (University of Minnesota Press, 2016); and University Babylon: Film and Race Politics on Campus (University of California, 2019). Sponsored by the Latin American Studies Program, the Dean of Arts and Sciences, and Revista de Estudios Hispánicos.
VIRTUAL – RSVP

10 MARCH  |  7 PM
Olivia Lott
In this virtual reading and discussion, doctoral candidate Olivia Lott will present her recent translation of Lucía Estrada’s Katabasis, the first full collection of poetry by a Colombian woman to be translated into English. It takes its title from the Greek word for descent, referring to both classical knowledge quests into the underworld by epic heroes and, more broadly, to any journey into madness, darkness, the unknown. A three-part plunge into the darkness of the world, and of the mind, Estrada’s prose poems depict the night, the subconscious, and the surreal. Katabasis is a finalist for the 2020 PEN Award for Poetry in Translation. Lott will be joined in discussion by Rebecca Hanssens-Reed, a doctoral student in Comparative Literature and fellow literary translator. International Writers Series, University Libraries.
VIRTUAL - RSVP

12 MARCH  |  12 PM
Reproductive Justice and the Prison-Industrial Complex: Examining the Connections
Join us for a discussion with organizers and practitioners in the fields of reproductive justice and prison abolition to learn about the connections between racial and sexual violence, transphobia and the prison-industrial complex. Speakers will address how barriers to health services and economic resources are shaped by white supremacy, settler colonialism, transphobia and sexism, and how collectives and individuals are organizing against mass incarceration. Topics include gender self-determination, the disproportionate impact of mass incarceration on Black, brown and Indigenous populations, alternatives to policing, sexual assault survivors and the law, and collective access to reproductive resources. Q&A to follow panelist presentations. Department of Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies.
VIRTUAL – RSVP

12 MARCH  |  3 PM
Dwandalyn Reece
DWANDALYN R. REECE is the associate director for curatorial affairs and supervisor museum curator at Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture. She brings more than 30 years of knowledge and experience in the museum field, including more than 10 years at NMAAHC as curator of music and performing arts. In that role she built a collection of over 4,000 objects; curated the museum’s inaugural permanent exhibition, Musical Crossroads, for which she received the Secretary’s Research Prize in 2017; curated the museum’s grand opening music festival, Freedom Sounds; served as executive committee chair of the pan-institutional group Smithsonian Music; and co-curated the Smithsonian Year of Music initiative in 2019. Prior to her tenure with NMAAHC, Dwan worked as a senior program officer at the National Endowment for the Humanities. She also has worked previously as the assistant director of the Louis Armstrong House Museum, chief curator at the Brooklyn Historical Society, and curator at the Motown Museum in Detroit. Department of Music.
VIRTUAL – RSVP

12 MARCH  |  3 PM
Narrating the Eighteenth Century in Qing Kashgar
DAVID BROPHY is a senior lecturer in modern Chinese history at the University of Sydney. His recently published translation, In Remembrance of the Saints, is a work of Chaghatay-language literature written in Kashgar in the 1780s, depicting the Islamic society of the Tarim Basin (today's Xinjiang) on the eve of its incorporation into the Qing Empire. For an understanding of the Qing expansion from a local Muslim perspective, it stands out as a unique source. The text reflects a complicated, multisided contest for power in the region during the 18th century, and the lingering fallout of conflicts among religious elites that divided the oasis society. This talk will introduce the work from both historical and literary perspectives, and reflect on how it can contribute to our understanding of Qing rule in Islamic Central Asia. Co-sponsored by the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures and WUSTL China Forum.
VIRTUAL – RSVP

13 MARCH  |  11 AM
Public Tour: Art, Untitled
LINGRAN ZHANG (Arts & Sciences ’21) explores the practice of titling artworks, considering how the “Untitled” label shapes viewer responses to a range of modern and contemporary artworks from the collection. Kemper Art Museum.
VIRTUAL - RSVP

15 MARCH  |  7 PM
Land of Milk, Honey, and Sunshine: Promises and Challenges for Renewable Energy in Israel
As the world faces increasing environmental threats due to climate change, Israel was marked as a promising source of technological innovation in solar energy. What happened to that promise, and what are Israel’s chances of decarbonizing its own energy market? Elai Rettig is the Israeli Institute Teaching Fellow in Israeli and Environmental Studies at Washington University in St. Louis.  In this three-part study, Rettig will explore the interplay between energy security and foreign policy in Israel from 1948 to the present. This lecture is the third of a three-part series. Virtual Israeli Center Series, Department of Jewish, Islamic, and Middle Eastern Studies.
VIRTUAL - RSVP

18 MARCH  |  5 PM
Guilty People: A Conversation with Abbe Smith and Paul Butler
Join Abbe Smith and Paul Butler, both from Georgetown Law, in conversation about Smith’s latest book, Guilty People, which challenges the dangerous assumption that the guilty are a separate species, unworthy of humane treatment. Criminal defense attorneys protect the innocent and guilty alike, but the majority of criminal defendants are guilty. This is as it should be in a free society. Yet there are many different types of crime and degrees of guilt, and the defense must navigate through a complex criminal justice system that is not always equipped to recognize nuances. In Guilty People, law professor and longtime criminal defense attorney Abbe Smith gives us a thoughtful and honest look at guilty individuals on trial. Each chapter tells compelling stories about real cases she handled. Some of her clients were guilty of only petty crimes and misdemeanors, while others committed offenses as grave as rape and murder. In the process, she answers the question that every defense attorney is routinely asked: How can you represent these people? Abbe Smith is director of Georgetown’s Criminal Defense & Prisoner Advocacy Clinic and the E. Barrett Prettyman Fellowship Program. Paul Butler, the Albert Brick Professor in Law at Georgetown University, is a former federal prosecutor, legal analyst for CNN, MSNBC and NPR. He is one of the nation’s most frequently consulted scholars on issues of race and criminal justice. Washington University School of Law Public Interest Law & Policy Speaker Series, co-sponsored by the Center for the Study of Race, Ethnicity & Equity.
VIRTUAL - RSVP

20 MARCH  |  3 PM
Hostile Terrain 94 Toe Tags with the Contemporary Art Museum
This is an off-campus opportunity (hosted at the Contemporary Art Museum) to participate in Hostile Terrain 94, a participatory art project memorializing migrant death in the Sonoran Desert. Help us by signing up to fill out toe tags with the names and identifying information of migrants who have died. Why participate? Because crossing a national border can cost a human being their home, their belongings and, sometimes, their life. By an accident of birth these individuals were on the “wrong” side of the border and died while trying to cross over. This is one thing we can do to remember these individuals and to call attention to the crisis at the border. If you are studying remotely and would still like to participate, please fill out a form with the number of toe tags you would like to receive via mail. Contemporary Art Museum.
VIRTUAL – RSVP

21 MARCH  |  2 PM
Public Tour: Figures of Myth and Legend
NINA HUANG (Sam Fox School ’22) considers how artists working in various artistic mediums have connected figures from ancient Greek and Roman mythology to their own historical contexts. This tour considers how artists working in various artistic mediums have connected figures from ancient Greek and Roman mythology to their own historical contexts. Kemper Art Museum.
VIRTUAL - RSVP

22 MARCH – 25 MARCH
Biggs Family Residency in Classics: Raffaella Cribiore
RAFFAELLA CRIBIORE is a professor of classics at New York University. She is a specialist in ancient education, from the 4th century BCE to the 4th century CE, and also studies Greek rhetoric in the Second Sophistic period. She is a papyrologist, mostly a literary papyrologist, and spends time every year at the NYU excavation in Egypt, Dakhla Oasis, where a school of higher education was found. Cribiore’s all-virtual Biggs Family Residency will focus on the topic “Taking Notes in Classical and Late Antique Philosophers’ Classes.” There will be three public events, all free and open to all comers who have access to Zoom and who register through the RSVP links (see website). Each event will begin with a formal introduction and will be followed by a discussion period. The schedule is as follows: Monday, March 22, 4:15 pm (lecture): “Notes on Notes: Ancient Annotations in Context”; Wednesday, March 24, 4:15 pm (seminar): “The Voice of Epictetus”; and Thursday, March 25, 4:15 pm (lecture): “Recording lectures of Philosophers.” Department of Classics.
VIRTUAL

22 MARCH  |  11 AM
Black Italians and Digital Culture in Contemporary Italy
FRED KUDJI KUWORNU, an Italian-Ghanaian filmmaker and activist-producer-educator, discusses issues of culture, race, identity and citizenship in contemporary Italy drawing from the new arena of social media. Kuwornu shines a spotlight on a generation of Black Italians — artists, entrepreneurs and bloggers — who have been affirming themselves in Italian culture and society gaining more visibility nationally and in the global Black diaspora. Among the topics of discussion are race and national identity, second generations and issues of citizenship in Italy, new media and activism, Black women in Italy, and music and media industry. After earning his degree in political sciences and mass media from the University of Bologna, Kuwornu moved to Rome, where he worked as a TV show writer for RAI public television. After working with the production crew of Spike Lee’s Miracle at St. Anna, Kuwornu made the award-winning documentary Buffalo Soldiers, based upon his research on the unknown story of the 92nd Infantry Buffalo Soldiers Division, the African American segregated combat unit that fought in Europe during WWII. In 2012, he released 18 Ius Soli, which examines multiculturalism in Italy but also specifically looks at questions of citizenship for the 1 million children of immigrants born and raised in Italy but are not yet Italian citizens. His 2016 Blaxploitalian: 100 Years of Black in Italian Cinema is a diasporic, hybrid, historical, critical and cosmopolitan documentary on African descent actors in Italian cinema. In 2020, Kuwornu launched Blaq•IT, the first Black Italian web-documentary devoted to the stories of Black Italians in Italy and in the world. Department of Romance Languages and Literatures.
VIRTUAL

24 MARCH  |  3 PM
Marcel’s Letters: A Font and the Search for One Man’s Fate
A true story of graphic designer Carolyn Porter, who stumbled across a bundle of letters while searching antique stores for inspiration to create a new font. As she struggled to design the font, she searched for information about the man who had written these letters during World War II and clues to what had become of him. Book club will begin with a showcase of typography in the Rare Book Collections, followed by a discussion of the book. University Libraries.
VIRTUAL - RSVP

25 MARCH  |  5 PM
A Conversation with Twyla Tharp
Join WashU alumnus Jamie Schutz, AB ’95, Emmy Award–winning producer and director, president of Stick Figure Entertainment, for a conversation with legendary dancer, director and choreographer Twyla Tharp. Stick Figure Entertainment, in association with American Masters Pictures, is debuting the documentary Twyla Moves on March 26, 2021, on PBS. This documentary features never-before-seen interviews and select performances from Tharp’s vast array of more than 160 choreographed works, including 129 dances, 12 television specials, six major Hollywood movies, four full-length ballets, four Broadway shows and two figure skating routines. The documentary features appearances by Misty Copeland, Herman Cornejo, David Byrne and Billy Joel. Director Steven Cantor will also join this conversation, with the trailer for the film to open the event. University Advancement.
VIRTUAL - RSVP

26 MARCH  |  12 PM
Public Tour: Art, Untitled
BRIDGET HALLIDAY (Sam Fox School ’22) explores the practice of titling artworks, considering how the “Untitled” label shapes viewer responses to a range of modern and contemporary artworks from the collection. Kemper Art Museum.
VIRTUAL – RSVP

26 MARCH  |  8 PM
Chinese-Language Tour: Picasso and Spain
Pablo Picasso was born and raised in Spain, and the impact of this cultural background can be perceived in many of his artworks. Yue Dai, a doctoral student in the Department of Art History & Archaeology, discusses Picasso’s works in the Kemper Art Museum collection in a range of media including paintings, prints and ceramics, and their connections to Spanish culture. This hour-long tour is in Chinese. Kemper Art Museum.
VIRTUAL – RSVP

27 MARCH – 28 MARCH
30th Annual Washington University Pow Wow
Since 1991, the Washington University in St. Louis Pow Wow has celebrated and honored American Indian/Alaska Native traditions and culture. The annual event is coordinated by students and scholars of the Kathryn M. Buder Center for American Indian Studies at the Brown School at Washington University. The Buder Center develops programs and curriculum, engages in research, builds relationships and partnerships with communities and people, and develops the ability of its students and alumni to make positive change in Indian Country. Pow Wows bring Native Americans and non-Native people together to dance, socialize, sing and celebrate. As a student-run event, the student committee is responsible for coordinating all aspects of the Pow Wow, from engaging with dancers and drummers from across Indian Country, to raising the funds necessary to host this educational and cultural event.
VIRTUAL

27 MARCH  |  8 PM
MFA Student Dance Concert: Pathway
The MFA Student Dance Concert represents the final component of the MFA in Dance program.  Each section of the concert combines the artistic expression and kinetic innovations of the MFA in Dance students. The overarching goal of the program is to develop each studen’'s personal artistic practice while encouraging a global perspective on dance studies, performance, pedagogy and choreography. The Saturday night event presents Pathway and takes us on a journey combining three distinct paths. One moves us through the world of grief, the powerful rollercoaster of human emotions. The next takes us on the passage of both the power and grace of Muslim women. In the final piece, we are immersed in the force of our neglect of Nature and her rebellious response. The concert speaks to the human spirit at its best and worst, through grief and grace. This concert represents the completion of the MFA in Dance requirements for our fourth cohort students: Leah Robertson, Luewilla Smith-Barnett and Thomas Proctor. The concert will be available on-demand thru Sunday, April 11, 2021. Performing Arts Department.
VIRTUAL

29 MARCH  |  3 PM
Greg Downey
GREG DOWNEY is a professor of anthropology at the Macquarie School of Social Sciences, writer and anthropologist who has conducted field research in Brazil, the United States and the Pacific. He has advocated extensively for neuroanthropology — the integration of brain and cultural research to understand how humans induce variation in their own nervous system. Downey is the author of Learning Capoeira: Lessons in Cunning from an Afro-Brazilian Art (Oxford, 2005). He is also the co-editor, with Daniel Lende, of The Encultured Brain: An Introduction to Neuroanthropology (MIT, 2012), and co-editor with Melissa Fisher of Frontiers of Capital: Ethnographic Reflections on the New Economy (Duke, 2006). Department of Music.
VIRTUAL - RSVP

31 MARCH  |  6 PM
Monumental Women: Female Statuary and the Struggle for Suffrage, 1870-1920
NICOLE WILLIAMS is an honorary guest scholar at the Department of Art History and Archaeology. Department of Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies.
VIRTUAL - RSVP

St. Louis Community Events

2 MARCH  |  11 AM
Women’s History Month Kickoff: Continuing the Legacy of Empowering Missouri Women
Inspired by the Missouri History Museum’s exhibit Beyond the Ballot, which commemorates the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment, we will talk to women who are continuing Missouri’s long legacy of empowering other women. Join us for a conversation with Leslie K. Gill, president of Rung for Women; Wendy Doyle, president and CEO of United WE; and Keri Koehler, executive director of the Women’s Foundation of Greater St. Louis. We’ll discuss the challenges facing women in our state today, how the pandemic has amplified these challenges, and how women are finding ways to support one another. The conversation will be moderated by Andrea Henderson of St. Louis Public Radio. ASL Interpretation provided. Missouri History Museum.
VIRTUAL

2 MARCH  |  7 PM
Charles Finch, An Extravagant Death: A Charles Lenox Mystery (Author Talk)
In conversation with Rhys Bowen, author of The Royal Spyness mystery series, historical suspense author Charles Finch presents the latest installment in his lauded series starring Victorian era gentleman sleuth Charles Lenox. In 1878 London, with faith in Scotland Yard shattered after a corruption investigation, Charles Lenox’s detective agency is rapidly expanding. On a diplomatic mission for the Queen, Lenox travels to New York to investigate the death of a beautiful socialite. St. Louis County Library.
VIRTUAL

3 MARCH  |  1 PM
James Canton, The Oak Papers (Author Talk)
JAMES CANTON will be in conversation with Left Bank Books co-owner Jarek Steele. Thrown into turmoil by the end of his long-term relationship, Professor James Canton spent two years meditating beneath the welcoming shelter of the massive 800-year-old Honywood Oak tree in North Essex, England. While considering the direction of his own life, he began to contemplate the existence of this colossus tree. Standing in England for centuries, the oak would have been a sapling when the Magna Carta was signed in 1215. Canton tells the story of this tree in its ecological, spiritual, literary and historical contexts, using it as a prism to see his own life and human history. The Oak Papers is a reflection on change and transformation, and the role nature has played in sustaining and redeeming us. Canton examines our long-standing dependency on the oak and how that has developed and morphed into myth and legend. We no longer need these sturdy trees to build our houses and boats, to fuel our fires or to grind their acorns into flour in times of famine. What purpose, then, do they serve in our world today? Are these miracles of nature no longer necessary to our lives? What can they offer us? Canton ponders the magic of nature and the threats its faces from human development to climate change, implores us to act as responsible stewards to conserve what is precious, and reminds us of the lessons we can learn from the world around us if only we slow down enough to listen. Left Bank Books.
VIRTUAL

3 MARCH  |  1 PM; 10 MARCH  |  1 PM; 17 MARCH  |  1 PM; 24 MARCH  |  1 PM; 31 MARCH  |  1 PM
Soldiers Memorial Outdoor Tours
Explore the architecture and history of the Soldiers Memorial Military Museum and the Court of Honor while learning of their role in the beautification of downtown St. Louis. This is an opportunity to better understand the symbolism and nuances of Soldiers Memorial’s massive Walker Hancock sculptures, spectacular Gold Star Mothers mosaic, calming effects of its reflecting pool and fountain and many other architectural tributes to those who served our country. Masking and social distancing required. $5. Register via the website. Missouri Historical Society.
IN PERSON: Soldiers Memorial Military Museum, 1315 Chestnut St, St. Louis, 63103

3 MARCH  |  7 PM
Carey Gillam, The Monsanto Papers (Author Talk)
Investigative journalist Carey Gillam will discuss her new book, The Monsanto Papers: Deadly Secrets, Corporate Corruption, and One Man’s Search for Justice. Lee Johnson was a man with simple dreams. All he wanted was a steady job and a nice home for his wife and children, something better than the hard life he knew growing up. He never imagined that he would become the face of a David-and-Goliath showdown against one of the world’s most powerful corporate giants. But a workplace accident left Lee doused in a toxic chemical and facing a deadly cancer that turned his life upside down. In 2018, the world watched as Lee was thrust to the forefront of one the most dramatic legal battles in recent history. The Monsanto Papers is the inside story of Lee Johnson’s landmark lawsuit against Monsanto. For Lee, the case was a race against the clock, with doctors predicting he wouldn’t survive long enough to take the witness stand. For the eclectic band of young, ambitious lawyers representing him, it was a matter of professional pride and personal risk with millions of dollars and hard-earned reputations on the line. For the public at large, the lawsuit presented a question of corporate accountability. With enough money and influence, could a company endanger its customers, hide evidence, manipulate regulators and get away with it all for decades? The Monsanto Papers takes readers behind the scenes of a grueling legal battle, pulling back the curtain on the frailties of the American court system and the lengths to which lawyers will go to fight corporate wrongdoing. Left Bank Books.
VIRTUAL

4 MARCH  |  6:30 PM
Everyone’s River: A Conversation with Two People Who Kayaked the Length of the Mississippi
Every year a few dozen adventurous individuals paddle the length of the Mississippi River from its source in northern Minnesota to the Gulf of Mexico. Traveling 2,300 miles in a canoe, kayak or standup paddleboard requires solid preparation, good equipment, perseverance, patience and some helping hands from strangers along the way. In this panel discussion, we’ll hear source-to-sea paddlers Maya Dizack and Stan Stark share their experiences. Dizack is the youngest woman and youngest woman of color to complete the trip; she was 19 when she paddled the river in 2019. Stark, on the other hand, descended the river in 2020 at 81 years of age, making him the oldest person to complete a source-to-sea paddle on the Mississippi. This program is associated with the exhibit Mighty Mississippi. Mississippi Meanderings Series, co-sponsored by Missouri History Museum and the Mississippi River Water Trails Association.
VIRTUAL

4 MARCH  |  7 PM
Nicole Perlroth, This is How They Tell Me the World Ends: The Cyber Weapons Arms Race (Author Talk)
New York Times cybersecurity reporter Nicole Perlroth presents the untold story of the cyberweapons market — the most secretive, invisible, government-backed market on earth. Based on years of reporting and hundreds of interviews, Perlroth lifts the curtain on a market in shadow, revealing the urgent threat faced by us all if we cannot bring the global cyber arms race to heel. Westfall Politics & History Series, St. Louis County Library.
VIRTUAL

5 MARCH  |  10 AM
The Divided City Podcast: Trauma as Culture in Black Families
StitchCast Studio is a youth-led podcast series launched by Saint Louis Story Stitchers Artists Collective in 2019. Episodes are recorded and published on topics determined by youth of color from St. Louis: gun violence, racial divisions in St. Louis, public health and safety issues, compounding issues, and more. StitchCast Studio Special Edition: The Divided City will produce and publish four 1-hour unique podcast episodes featuring African American youth, ages 16 to 24 years old, that live in neighborhoods with high crime and poverty rates in St. Louis. The conversations with Story Stitchers’ black youth will be led by Stitchers Youth Council co-chair Branden Lewis and will also feature African American humanities scholars, master storyteller Bobby Norfolk; filmmaker and Washington University alumnus Jun Bae; author and educator John A. Wright; Sowande’ Mustakeem, an associate professor of history and African and African American Studies at Washington University; L.J. Punch, MD, President of Power4STL and an American Critical Care Surgeon. The Divided City Initiative, Washington Univeristy.
VIRTUAL

5 MARCH  |  7 PM
C.J. Box, Dark Sky: A Joe Pickett Novel (Author Talk)
The governor of Wyoming gives Joe Pickett, an everyman hero with a penchant for stepping into trouble, the thankless assignment of taking a tech baron on an elk hunting trip. Unbeknownst to them, a manhunter is hot on their heels. Finding himself without a weapon, a horse or a way to communicate, Joe must rely on his wits and his knowledge of the outdoors to protect himself and his charge. St. Louis County Library.
VIRTUAL

5 MARCH  |  7 PM
See STL: STL Underground
St. Louis Underground will explore more than just caves. We’ll also wind our way through sewers, sinkholes, train tunnels, rivers, bunkers and mine shafts. Join us to learn all about the history hiding right beneath your feet. Missouri Historical Society.
VIRTUAL

8 MARCH  |  1 PM
Sonia Faleiro with Tania James, The Good Girls (Author Talk)
SONIA FALEIRO will be in conversation with novelist Tania James. An inquest into how the mysterious deaths of two teenage girls shines a light into the darkest corners of a nation. The girls’ names were Padma and Lalli, but they were so inseparable that people in the village called them Padma Lalli. Sixteen-year-old Padma sparked and burned. Fourteen-year-old Lalli was an incorrigible romantic. They grew up in Katra Sadatganj, an eye-blink of a village in western Uttar Pradesh crammed into less than one square mile of land. It was out in the fields, in the middle of mango season, that the rumors started. Then one night in the summer of 2014, the girls went missing; hours later they were found hanging in the orchard. Who they were and what had happened to them was already less important than what their disappearance meant to the people left behind. In the ensuing months, the investigation into their deaths would implode everything that their small community held to be true and instigate a national conversation about sex and violence. Slipping deftly behind political maneuvering, caste systems and codes of honor in a village in northern India, The Good Girls returns to the scene of Padma and Lalli’s short lives and shameful deaths, and dares to ask: What is the human cost of shame? Left Bank Books.
VIRTUAL

8 MARCH  |  4 PM
Natalie Walton with Shafia Zaloom, Revenge of the Sluts (Author Talk)
NATALIE WALTON will be in conversation with health and sex education expert Shafia Zaloom. Double standards are about to get singled out. Walton tackles privacy and relationships in the digital age. As lead reporter for The Warrior Weekly, Eden has covered her fair share of stories at St. Joseph Secondary. And when intimate pictures of six female students are anonymously emailed to the entire school, Eden is determined to get to the bottom of it. In tracking down leads, Eden is shocked to discover not everyone agrees the students are victims. Some people feel the girls “brought it on themselves.” Even worse, the school’s administration seems more concerned about protecting its reputation than its students. With the anonymous sender threatening more emails, Eden finds an unlikely ally: the six young women themselves. Left Bank Books.
VIRTUAL

8 MARCH  |  7 PM
Dr. Jason Karlawish, The Problem of Alzheimer’s: How Science, Culture, and Politics Turned a Rare Disease Into a Crisis and What We Can Do About It (Author Talk)
Co-director of the Penn Memory Center, Dr. Jason Karlawish presents a definitive book on one of today’s most prevalent illnesses. Part case studies, part meditation on the past, present and future of the disease, The Problem of Alzheimer’s traces the disease from its discovery and tells the story of the biomedical breakthroughs that may allow it to finally be prevented and treated by medicine. Karlawish shares how we can live with dementia, the ways patients can reclaim their autonomy and the innovative reforms we can make as a society that would give caregivers and patients better quality of life. Medical Arts Author Series, St. Louis County Library.
VIRTUAL

8 MARCH  |  7:30 PM
McCabe & Mrs. Miller (1971)
This unorthodox dream western by Robert Altman stars Warren Beatty and Julie Christie as two newcomers to the raw Pacific Northwest mining town of Presbyterian Church, who join forces to provide the miners with a superior kind of whorehouse experience. The appearance of representatives of a powerful mining company with interests of its own, however, threatens to be the undoing of their plans. The introduction and discussion are conducted by Charles Taylor, author of Opening Wednesday at a Theater or Drive-In Near You: The Shadow Cinema of the American ’70s and former film critic for Salon. Golden Anniversaries Film Series, Cinema St. Louis.
VIRTUAL

9 MARCH  |  5:30 PM
Elon Green with David Grann, Robert Kolker, & Sarah Weinman, Last Call: A True Story of Love, Lust, and Murder in Queer New York (Author Talk)
In July 1992, at the Townhouse Bar, the piano player seems to know every song ever written, the crowd belts out the lyrics to their favorites, and a man standing nearby is drinking a Scotch and water. The man strikes the piano player as forgettable. He looks bland and inconspicuous and not at all what you think a serial killer looks like. But that’s what he is, and tonight, he has his sights set on a gray-haired man. He will not be his first victim nor will he be his last. The Last Call Killer preyed upon gay men in New York in the ’80s and ’90s and had all the hallmarks of the most notorious serial killers. Yet because of the sexuality of his victims, the sky-high murder rates and the AIDS epidemic, his murders have been almost entirely forgotten. This true-crime narrative tells the story of the Last Call Killer and the decades-long chase to find him. At the same time, it paints a portrait of his victims and a vibrant community navigating threat and resilience. Book purchase required. Sponsored by Left Bank Books and CrimeReads.
VIRTUAL

9 MARCH  |  7 PM
Viet Thanh Nguyen with Min Jin Lee, The Committed (Author Talk)
VIET THANH NGUYEN will be in conversation with best-selling author Min Jin Lee. The Committed follows the unnamed Sympathizer as he arrives in Paris in the early 1980s with his blood brother Bon. The pair try to overcome their pasts and ensure their futures by engaging in capitalism in one of its purest forms: drug dealing. Traumatized by his re-education at the hands of his former best friend, Man, and struggling to assimilate into French culture, the Sympathizer finds Paris both seductive and disturbing. As he falls in with a group of left-wing intellectuals whom he meets at dinner parties given by his French Vietnamese “aunt,” he finds stimulation for his mind but also customers for his narcotic merchandise. But the new life he is making has perils he has not foreseen, whether the self-torture of addiction, the authoritarianism of a state locked in a colonial mindset or the seeming paradox of how to reunite his two closest friends whose worldviews put them in absolute opposition. The Sympathizer will need all his wits, resourcefulness and moral flexibility if he is to prevail. Book purchase required. Left Bank Books.
VIRTUAL

10 MARCH  |  12 PM
Soldiers Chow and Chat: Changing the Face of Courage
Marine Corps veteran and past Department of Missouri Commander of the American Legion Betty Gonzales will outline women’s contributions to the U.S. military since World War I, including several St. Louisans, and she’ll discuss the fight for recognition of their sacrifices. Missouri Historical Society.
VIRTUAL

10 MARCH  |  7 PM
Chris Whitaker, We Begin at the End (Author Talk)
CHRIS WHITAKER will discuss his debut novel, which is about people who deserve so much more than life serves them. It is a tale of how the human spirit prevails and how, in the end, love — in all its different guises — wins. There are two kinds of families: the ones we are born into and the ones we create. Walk has never left the coastal California town where he grew up. He may have become the chief of police, but he’s still trying to heal the old wound of having given the testimony that sent his best friend, Vincent King, to prison decades before. Now, 30 years later, Vincent is being released. Duchess is a 13-year-old self-proclaimed outlaw. Her mother, Star, grew up with Walk and Vincent. Walk is in overdrive trying to protect them, but Vincent and Star seem bent on sliding deeper into self-destruction. Star always burned bright, but recently that light has dimmed, leaving Duchess to parent not only her mother but her five-year-old brother. She’s just trying to survive and keep her family together. A fortysomething-year-old sheriff and a 13-year-old girl may not seem to have a lot in common, but they both have come to expect that people will disappoint you, loved ones will leave you, and if you open your heart, it will be broken. Left Bank Books.
VIRTUAL

11 MARCH  |  6 PM
Anne Lamott, Dusk, Night, Dawn (Author Talk)
ANNE LAMOTT will be in conversation with a yet-to-be-announced partner. In Dusk, Night, Dawn, she explores the tough questions that many of us grapple with. How can we recapture the confidence we once had as we stumble through the dark times that seem increasingly bleak? As bad news piles up — from climate crises to daily assaults on civility — how can we cope? We begin, Lamott says, by accepting our flaws and embracing our humanity. Drawing from her own experiences, Lamott shows us the intimate and human ways we can adopt to move through life’s dark places and toward the light of hope that still burns ahead for all of us and explores the thorny issues of life and faith by breaking them down into manageable, human-sized questions for readers to ponder and showing us how we can amplify life’s small moments of joy by staying open to love and connection. Marrying for the first time with a grown son and a grandson, Lamott explains that finding happiness with a partner isn’t a function of age or beauty but of outlook and perspective. Book purchase required. Left Bank Books.
VIRTUAL

11 MARCH  |  6:30 PM
Where the Peep Light Leads
LEE HENDRIX has spent much of his adult life working on the Mississippi River, pursuing the glow of a peep light. In this talk, Hendrix will share stories about his experiences piloting commercial towboats, overnight passenger boats such as the American Queen, gambling boats, day excursion vessels, the massive M/V Mississippi and dredge tenders. He’ll discuss the different types of river vessels and explain how people who use the river safely interact with one another. He’ll also talk about how he has helped students, teachers and adventurers navigate their Mississippi canoe trips. This program is associated with Mighty Mississippi exhibit. Mississippi Meanderings Series, co-sponsored by Missouri History Museum and the Mississippi River Water Trails Association.
VIRTUAL

12 MARCH  |  10 AM
Jen Liu, Pink Slime Caesar Shift: Gold Loop (Chapter 1)
JEN LIU premieres her video Pink Slim Caesar Shift: Gold Loop (2020–21) revised for three-part virtual screening (Triad). The work is a reflection on e-waste, political resistance, industrial poisoning and disappearing activists. The online screening accompanies the gallery presentation Pink Slime Caesar Shift: Gold Loop. Chapter 1 premieres March 12, and will be on view through May 11. Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis.
VIRTUAL

12 MARCH  |  12 PM
Spring/Summer Exhibitions Opening
Join us for the opening of CAM’s Spring/Summer exhibitions, featuring Stories of Resistance, a museum-wide group show, and Radio Resistance in the Education Gallery. Visitors must have a ticket to attend the public opening. Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis.
IN PERSON - Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis, 3750 Washington Boulevard, St. Louis, MO 63108

16 MARCH  |  11 AM
Three Flags Day: Colonial St. Louis Women Under Changing Regimes
In the 40 years between the time St. Louis was founded in 1764 to when the American flag was raised in 1804, St. Louisans were the subjects of three different empires, and with each new flag came new laws and customs. Community tours manager Amanda Clark will discuss how women — free and enslaved — experienced life in colonial St. Louis under Spanish, French and, finally, American rule. This program is part of our 2021 Missouri Bicentennial programming, commemorating 200 years of Missouri history. Missouri History Museum.
VIRTUAL

16 MARCH  |  6 PM
Kazuo Ishiguro with Ron Charles, Klara and the Sun (Author Talk)
Nobel laureate Kazuo Ishiguro will be in conversation with The Washington Post’s Ron Charles. Klara and the Sun, the first novel by Kazuo Ishiguro since he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature, tells the story of Klara, an Artificial Friend with outstanding observational qualities, who, from her place in the store, watches carefully the behavior of those who come in to browse and of those who pass on the street outside. She remains hopeful that a customer will soon choose her. Klara and the Sun offers a look at our changing world through the eyes of an unforgettable narrator and one that explores the fundamental question: What does it mean to love? Book purchase required. Left Bank Books.
VIRTUAL

16 MARCH  |  7 PM
John A. Wright Sr. and John A. Wright Jr., Extraordinary Black Missourians: Pioneers, Leaders, Performers, Athletes, and Other Notables - 2nd Edition (Author Talk)
Historians and father-and-son writing team John A Wright Sr. and John A. Wright Jr. present the second edition of Extraordinary Black Missourians, which profiles more than 100 notable citizens such as George Washington Carver, Frankie Freeman, Scott Joplin, Elizabeth Keckley, Jean Baptiste Point du Sable, Grace Bumbry and others who have contributed to Missouri’s African American legacy. Learn how their lives and accomplishments have played a major role in shaping the history and culture of the state and nation. St. Louis County Library.
VIRTUAL

18 MARCH  |  6:30 PM
High Water Everywhere: Blues, Gospel, and Country Music Response to the Flood of 1927
When the Mississippi River and its tributaries flooded in 1927 it was arguably the greatest natural disaster in United States history. It went on to inspire more than 20 recorded songs. Many of them were blues, gospel and country — the genres that most appealed to flood victims in the South — and the disaster was referenced in pop music as well. Music scholar and performer David Evans will play selections from these songs and examine their themes. Most of these songs were written by Black singers, who imbued them with a perspective that has often been overlooked in more modern retellings of the flood. This program is associated with the Mighty Mississippi exhibition and the museum’s 2021 Missouri Bicentennial programming, commemorating 200 years of Missouri history. Mississippi Meanderings Series, co-sponsored by Missouri History Museum and Mississippi River Water Trails Association.
VIRTUAL

18 MARCH  |  7 PM
Ioan Grillo, Blood Gun Money: How America Arms Gangs and Cartels (Author Talk)
IOAN GRILLO will be in conversation with award-winning investigative journalist Ben Westhoff. In Ioan Grillo’s new work of investigative journalism, he follows the legal and black market for guns in the Americas and how it has made the continent the most murderous on earth. Grillo travels to gun manufacturers, strolls the aisles of gun shows and gun shops, talks to FBI agents who have infiltrated biker gangs, hangs out on Baltimore street corners and visits the ATF gun tracing center in West Virginia. Along the way, he details the many ways that legal guns can pass into the hands of criminals and the simple legislative measures that would help close these loopholes. St. Louis County Library.
VIRTUAL

18 MARCH  |  7 PM
Steven Salvatore, Can’t Take That Away (Author Talk)
STEVEN SALVATORE will be in conversation with former Left Bank Books children’s literature specialist Sarah Holt. An empowering and emotional debut about a genderqueer teen who finds the courage to stand up and speak out for equality when they are discriminated against by their high school administration. Carey Parker dreams of being a diva and bringing the house down with song. They can hit every note of all the top pop and Broadway hits. But despite their talent, emotional scars from an incident with a homophobic classmate and their grandmother’s spiraling dementia make it harder and harder for Carey to find their voice. Then Carey meets Cris, a singer/guitarist who makes Carey feel seen for the first time in their life. With the rush of a promising new romantic relationship, Carey finds the confidence to audition for the role of Elphaba, the Wicked Witch of the West, in the school musical, setting off a chain reaction of prejudice by Carey’s tormentor and others in the school. It’s up to Carey, Cris and their friends to defend their rights — and they refuse to be silenced. Left Bank Books.
VIRTUAL

21 MARCH  |  1:30 PM
Sunday Poetry Workshop: Karen Craigo
St. Louis Poetry Center’s signature program, the Sunday poetry workshop, features critic Karen Craigo. Karen Craigo is the poet laureate of Missouri, as well as the author of two poetry collections, Passing Through Humansville (Sundress, 2018) and No More Milk (Sundress, 2016). Her chapbook, Stone for an Eye (2004), won the Wick Chapbook Competition. Her poems have appeared in Poetry magazine, Indiana Review and Crab Orchard Review. Her fiction, essays and journalism are also widely published. She holds an MFA from Bowling Green State University. She is editor and general manager of a small Missouri weekly newspaper, The Marshfield Mail. St. Louis Poetry Center.
VIRTUAL – RSVP

23 MARCH  |  11 AM
The River Connects Us All: A Look at the Mississippi River Cities and Towns Initiative
Join Mayor Sharon Weston Broome of Baton Rouge, Louisiana, for a conversation about how mayors up and down the Mississippi River are working with one another and with their communities to address important issues, such as disaster resilience and adaptation, clean water and sustainable economies. Hear about some of the group’s recent major accomplishments, including the Resilience Revolving Loan Fund Act and the Plastic Waste Reduction Campaign. This program is associated with the Mighty Mississippi exhibit. Co-sponsored by Missouri History Museum and the Mississippi River Cities and Towns Initiative.
VIRTUAL

23 MARCH  |  6:30 PM
The Architecture of Carlo Scarpa: Recomposing Place, Intertwining Time, Transforming Reality
ROBERT McCARTER, the Ruth and Norman Moore Professor of Architecture at Washington University. 2021 Architecture Around the World series, co-sponsored by St. Louis Public Library’s Steedman Architectural Library and the Society of Architectural Historians - St. Louis Chapter.
VIRTUAL – RSVP

23 MARCH  |  7 PM
Emily St. John Mandel, The Glass Hotel (Author Talk)
EMILY ST. JOHN MANDEL will be in conversation with Ryan Krull, the interviews editor at Boulevard Magazine. Mandel’s new novel is set at the glittering intersection of two seemingly disparate events — a massive Ponzi scheme collapse and the mysterious disappearance of a woman from a ship at sea. In this story of crisis and survival, Mandel takes readers through often hidden landscapes: campgrounds for the near-homeless, service in luxury hotels and life in a federal prison. The Glass Hotel provides a portrait of greed and guilt, love and delusion, ghosts and unintended consequences, and the infinite ways we search for meaning in our lives. St. Louis County Library.
VIRTUAL

23 MARCH  |  7:30 PM
Poets and Their Alter Egos
Poetry at the Point features Lynn Levin and Carolyne Wright. This reading series invites local and regional poets, and established and up-and-coming poets to share their words. Lynn Levin is a poet, writer, translator, teacher and a native of St. Louis. Her most recent poetry collection, The Minor Virtues (Ragged Sky, 2020), was listed as one of spring 2020’s best books by The Philadelphia Inquirer. Her poems have appeared in Boulevard, The Hopkins Review, Artful Dodge, The American Journal of Poetry, Margie and Rattle. Her previous poetry collections include Miss Plastique, Fair Creatures of an Hour and Imaginarium. She is the translator, from the Spanish, of Birds on the Kiswar Tree by Odi Gonzales and co-author of Poems for the Writing: Prompts for Poets. A Bucks County, Pennsylvania Poet Laureate, Levin teaches at Drexel University. Carolyne Wright’s most recent books are This Dream the World: New & Selected Poems (Lost Horse Press, 2017), whose title poem received a Pushcart Prize and appeared in The Best American Poetry 2009; and the groundbreaking co-edited anthology, Raising Lilly Ledbetter: Women Poets Occupy the Workspace (Lost Horse, 2015), which received ten Pushcart Prize nominations. A contributing editor for the Pushcart Prizes and translation editor for Artful Dodge, Wright has also published five award-winning volumes of poetry translated from Spanish and Bengali. She teaches for Seattle’s Richard Hugo House. St. Louis Poetry Center.
VIRTUAL

25 MARCH  |  6:30 PM
Thomas F. Curran, Women Making War: Female Confederate Prisoners and Union Military Justice (Author Talk)
St. Louis author Thomas F. Curran will give an overview of his latest book, which focuses on women Confederate partisans who were imprisoned in St. Louis and the United States government’s response to their political agency. This program is part of our 2021 Missouri Bicentennial programming, commemorating 200 years of Missouri history. Missouri Historical Society.
VIRTUAL

26 MARCH  |  7 PM
Lisa Scottoline, Eternal (Author Talk)
Set in Rome during the ventennio, the 20 years of Mussolini’s rise and fall, Eternal centers on Elisabetta, Marco and Sandro, who grew up as the best of friends despite their differences. But in the autumn of 1937, all of that changes as Mussolini asserts his power, aligning Italy’s Fascists with Hitler’s Nazis. Everything that the three friends hold dear — their families, their homes and their connection to one another — is tested in ways they never could have imagined. Eternal is a saga of loyalty and loss, family and food, love and hate — all set in one of the world’s most beautiful cities at its darkest moment. St. Louis County Library.
VIRTUAL

30 MARCH  |  11 AM
Twain the Humanitarian
FAYE DANT, executive director of Jim’s Journey: The Huck Finn Freedom Center in Hannibal, Missouri, will discuss Mark Twain’s evolving views on race. She’ll trace his childhood with slave-owning parents in pro-slavery Missouri to the unlearning that changed his heart and led him to use satire and humor as a conduit for change. Dant will also discuss those who helped Twain unlearn his views and shape his awareness, as well as actions he took in support of the African American community. Missouri History Museum.
VIRTUAL