We hope you enjoy this month’s Humanities Broadsheet — a compilation of events organized by or featuring members of the Washington University community, as well as our colleagues in the greater humanities community in the St. Louis area. 

Click through each event to see the organizer’s complete listing. As you’ll see below, there’s always something going on! 

Organizers may submit events to cenhumcal@wustl.edu. Find last month’s issue here.


 

Humanities Broadcast

 

6 MARCH  |  5:30 PM
An Evening with Gerald Early: Reconceiving the National Baseball Hall of Fame’s Black Baseball Exhibit
An award-winning essayist, author and American culture critic, Gerald Early is the Merle Kling Professor of Modern Letters in the Department of African and African American Studies and executive editor of WashU’s interdisciplinary journal, The Common Reader. Early will discuss his work as a consultant to the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum’s newly renovated and reconceived exhibit on Black Baseball, which will officially open on Memorial Day weekend 2024, and the book he’s writing to accompany the exhibit. “Play Harder: The Triumph of Black Baseball in America” will cover Black players’ involvement with professional baseball in the United States from the end of the Civil War to the present, with accounts of the Negro Leagues, the integration of Major League Baseball, the Black press’ promotion of the game and why Black American participation in baseball today is less robust than in the past. Q&A and post-event reception to follow. Virtual attendance is also available. RSVP requested; see website. WashU Alumni Association and Arts & Sciences.
Washington University, Knight Hall, Emerson Auditorium & Virtual

WashU Events

THROUGH MARCH 10
FLY
Premiering off-Broadway in 1997, this one-person dramatic comedy received three AUDELCO awards for excellence in Black theatre and has had a limited tour in the years since. The story centers around an African American man who believes he will receive the power to fly on the night of a special celestial event. As he prepares for the event on a Brooklyn rooftop, he shares the comic, dramatic and tragic experiences that have pushed him to the edge of reality. $15; student tickets available at the door. The Black Rep.
Washington University, Mallinckrodt Center, Hotchner Theatre

1 MARCH  |  9:30 AM
Making Rulers Our Equals
CLAUDIO LÓPEZ-GUERRA, University of Richmond. Politicians like to repeat that “we are all in this together,” that “we are all in the same boat.” Yet they wage wars that they do not fight; they neglect schools that their kids do not attend; they marginalize neighborhoods where they do not live; they allow exploitative workplaces where they do not work; they underfund healthcare systems that they do not use; they ruin economies that they can easily escape. In a nutshell, they lack enough skin in the game. This is a type of political inequality that has not been sufficiently discussed by political philosophers and the public at large. There is a case to be made for requiring high public officials to cast their lot with the governed and internalize the costs of their decisions on a footing of equality. All are welcome; please RSVP. Department of Philosophy. 
Washington University, Danforth University Center, Goldberg Formal Lounge

1 MARCH  |  2 PM
Beyond Borders: Navigating the Fluidity of K in K-Pop
WONSEOK LEE is a lecturer in Korean studies at Washington University. This talk explores transnational aspects of K-pop, Korean popular music and the complicated meaning of K. In the conventional sense of the term, K-pop refers to an ethno-national musical genre: dance-pop songs with Korean lyrics performed by predominantly ethnic Korean musicians. However, as the genre has absorbed diverse ethnicities and languages, it is hard to say contemporary K-pop is a fixed concept tied to national identity. It gives rise to questions about what the K in K-pop means and how to define K-pop. In this talk, Lee discusses why K in K-pop does not exist as a fixed concept but exists as a floating signifier and how K-pop, as imagined Kommunity pop, makes global fans connected beyond borders. Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures. 
Washington University, Busch Hall, Room 202

1 MARCH  |  3 PM
Interpreting Chromaticism in Post-Millennial Pop/Rock
BRAD OSBORN, professor of music theory, University of Kansas. Scholars of popular music have written extensively about the chromaticism germane to classic rock of the 1970s–1990s. Far less attention has been paid to the nuanced ways that post-millennial pop/rock songwriters and performers incorporate chromaticism into their compositions. Post-millennial pop/rock music is, on the whole, less chromatic than its classic rock counterpart and tends to organize its harmonic content into repeating loops. In this talk, Brad Osborn, a scholar of music theory and popular music studies, introduces a few of the most common chromatic techniques in post-millennial pop/rock — including “dual leading tone loops” and “triple tonic loops” — and discuss some strategies for interpreting these chromatic loops in concert with a song’s lyrics, timbres or form. Department of Music.
Washington University, Music Classroom Building, Room 102

1 MARCH  |  3 PM
Stop! Shakespeare, Boal and the Italian Spect-actor
ROBERT HENKE is a professor of drama and comparative literature and director of graduate studies at Washington University. During a time when many “England First” nationalists thought a “pure” national identity could be created by purging the nation of Italian influence, Shakespeare embraced Italian stories, plays and theatrical ideas and, along with that, a humanistic spirit of curiosity, mobility and open-mindedness. This talk considers the Italian “sources” of his plays, especially when Shakespeare departs from them, as resonant and playable alternatives, not unlike the interventions of the spect-actor in Augusto Boal’s Forum theater. Performing Arts Department.
Washington University, Edison Theatre

5 MARCH  |  4 PM
A Talk: In Search of the Universal
How is the postcolonial novel different from the immigrant novel? And the immigrant novel from the global novel? Finally, is the global the same as the universal? As a novelist and a teacher of contemporary fiction, Amitava Kumar, the Helen D. Lockwood Professor of English at Vassar College, struggles with these questions. If he puts foreign graduate students in his story, has he written a global novel? If an immigrant tale about Indians in America makes no mention of caste is it really a postcolonial novel? Also, if an immigrant story is full of nostalgia and heartbreak but doesn’t mention anything about class or caste or issues of gender or sexual differences, does it at least get to be a cosmopolitan text? This talk will take up briefly the examples of Jamaica Kincaid, J.M. Coetzee, Perumal Murugan, Arundhati Roy, Mohsin Hamid, Zadie Smith, Jhumpa Lahiri and Vivek Shanbhag. Hurst Visiting Professors Series, Department of English.
Washington University, Duncker Hall, Hurst Lounge (Room 201)

5 MARCH  |  7 PM
Meet the Makers: An Insider’s Look at OTSL’s New Works Collective
Last winter, more than 130 artists applied to create new operas with Opera Theatre of St. Louis. Ultimately, just three multi-genre teams were selected by a panel of St. Louis artists, advocates and community leaders. Now, those three teams are about to prove just how innovative, inclusive and fun opera can be. Department of Music.
Washington University, Pillsbury Theatre, 560 Music Center

6 MARCH  |  12 PM
A Conversation with Salwa Abu Ghali in Jenin
SALWA ABU GHALI is a Palestinian resident of Jenin refugee camp who works with the refugee organization NaTakallam. David Warren, lecturer of Middle East studies and Arabic, Washington University, will host NaTakallam and Salwa Abu Ghali. Salwa considers herself a cultural ambassador for Palestine to the world and loves passing on Palestinian recipes and other tangible aspects of her heritage. Since the conflict broke out in Gaza, where much of her mother’s family lives, the West Bank has become a militarized zone, with incursions every couple of days. NaTakallam (“We Speak” in Arabic) is an award-winning social enterprise that delivers quality language-learning, translation and cultural exchange services by vetted and highly skilled refugees, displaced persons and their host communities worldwide. NaTakallam’s academic programs leverage technology to deliver high-quality, curated language learning and cultural exchange services delivered by refugees and displaced persons. Jewish, Islamic, and Middle Eastern Studies.
VIRTUAL — RSVP

7 MARCH  |  6 PM
Experimental Cinema of Germaine Dulac and Maya Deren
Learn about avant-garde films by women in this screening of Germaine Dulac’s The Seashell and the Clergyman (1928, 40 min.), considered one of the first Surrealist films; and Maya Deren’s A Study in Choreography for Camera (1945, 3 min.), which features the dancer Talley Beatty in a magisterial cinematic interpretation of dance. Presented in conjunction with the exhibition The Body in Pieces, these silent films feature innovative special effects that present the human form as physically fractured and fragmented across time. A discussion following the screening with Dana Ostrander, assistant curator of modern art, Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum; Lionel Cuillé, teaching professor in French in the Department of Romance Languages and Literatures, Washington University, and director of French Connexions; and Victor Putinier, PhD student in Romance Languages and Literatures, Washington University, will explore these two key figures in the development of experimental cinema and proto-feminist practice. Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum.
Washington University, Steinberg Auditorium

12 MARCH  |  12:30 PM
Losing HER Voice: Mental Health Implications of Abortion Restrictions
MEGAN D. KEYES, PhD, adjunct faculty, Brown School, Washington University, and founder, Trauma Empowered Consulting, LLC.  The Supreme Court’s decision to overturn Roe v. Wade in June 2022 adversely impacts women on multiple levels. Research indicates loss of personal autonomy regarding reproductive choice can result in mental health problems and reduced well-being. However, these negative repercussions may be more detrimental for specific cohorts of women including members of marginalized communities as well as survivors of intimate partner violence and sexual assault. Please join Dr. Keyes to learn more about the various life circumstances, potential stressors and trauma exposure, and mental health issues these women often experience and how abortion denial may further complicate their health and welfare. Brown School Open Classroom.
VIRTUAL – RSVP

13 MARCH  |  4 PM
Healthmaking in Ancient Egypt
ANNE AUSTIN, assistant professor of anthropology and archaeology at the University of Missouri–St. Louis, explores how ancient Egyptians used their social networks to improve their health through the ancient Egyptian village of Deir el-Medina. Historia Medica Lecture, Center for the History of Medicine, Bernard Becker Medical Library.
Washington University, Medical School Campus, Farrell Learning and Teaching Center, Holden Auditorium

18–21 MARCH 
The Biggs Family Residency in Classics: Francesco De Angelis
FRANCESCO DE ANGELIS is professor of art history and archaeology at Columbia University. Department of Classics.
4 pm, March 18, Umrath Lounge in Umrath Hall: Colloquium — The Making of Victory: Triumphal Arches and Their Representation in Roman Art
4 pm, March 20, Seigle Hall, Room 301: Seminar — Paying Attention: Images of Arches on Ancient Roman Coins
4 pm, March 21, Steinberg Auditorium: Lecture — What Monuments for a Modern Century? Italian Colonial Arches in Africa

18 MARCH  |  2 PM
An anecdotic topography of chance: Una topografía anecdótica del azar
¿Cuáles son las historias que se esconden en los objetos cotidianos? ¿Por qué importa pensarlas al escribir? Este breve taller te invita a explorar las relaciones sociales y de producción, las políticas de valor, y las conexiones afectivas que hay detrás o establecemos alrededor de las cosas que desechamos y guardamos.
What are the stories behind everyday objects? Why does it matter while we write? In this workshop in Spanish, distinguished artist and author Verónica Gerber Bicecci will invite attendees to explore the social and productive relationships, the value we inscribe, as well as the affective connections behind the objects we choose to keep and to discard. Participants must bring an everyday object of their preference. Note: This workshop will be held in Spanish and conversational Spanish is required for participation. RSVP requested; see website. University Libraries.
Washington University, Olin Library, Instruction Room 3

18 MARCH  |  4 PM
Territorial Sovereignty and Socialist Landscape Paintings
LAIKWAN PANG is the Choh-Ming Li Professor of Cultural and Religious Studies at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. This presentation, a chapter of Pang’s forthcoming book “One and All: The Logic of Chinese Sovereignty,” Pang discusses how the national landscape was presented in a new state-sponsored genre of modern ink brush paintings in Socialist China. These works were invested with heavy political, aesthetic and economic values, and they reveal the mutual appropriation between the socialist nation-building and traditional Confucian and Daoist aesthetics. Artists were subjected to intense political scrutiny, although some also gained political capital by producing works to support the state ideology. Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures.
Washington University, Busch Hall, Room 18

19 MARCH  |  2 PM
Book Making Workshop: Abstract Comics 
Is it possible to tell stories with figures and abstract forms? Can diagrams relate conflicts, meetings of minds or disagreements? In this workshop, join distinguished artist and author Verónica Gerber Bicecci to consider the proposals of a number of artists who have worked on these questions in order to appropriate the comic. Attendees will be able to take home the original comic piece they produce after a record is produced of each piece. Materials will be provided. No experience is required. University Libraries.
Washington University, Olin Library, Room 142

19 MARCH  |  5 PM
The Queerness of Religion 
TRACY FESSENDEN is the Steve and Margaret Forster Professor in the School of Historical, Philosophical, and Religious Studies and director of strategic initiatives in the Center for the Study of Religion and Conflict at Arizona State University. She holds degrees in religious studies from the University of Virginia and in English from Yale. Her work focuses on religion and American literature and the arts; gender, race and sexuality in American religious history; and the relationship between religion and the secular in American law, culture, and public life. Hurst Visiting Professors Series. Department of English.
Washington University, Duncker Hall, Hurst Lounge (Room 201)

20 MARCH  |  5:30 PM
International Writers Series: Verónica Gerber Bicecci
Genre-defying author Verónica Gerber Bicecci will be in conversation with Paco Tijerina, PhD candidate in Hispanic Studies, Washington University. Verónica Gerber Bicecci is a visual artist who writes. Her artistic quest — the interface between the word and the image — began with the series of drawings Diagrams of Silence, an exercise in visual exhumation based on the punctuation of various poems and the book Mudanza, a collection of essays about writers who deserted conventional literature to become visual artists. Her fiction and prose work have been translated into English by Christina MacSweeney, including the novel Empty Set and In the Eye of Bambi. RSVP requested; see website. University Libraries. 
Washington University, Olin Library, Ginkgo Reading Room

21 MARCH  |  10 AM
Tracy Fessenden - Workshop 
TRACY FESSENDEN is the Steve and Margaret Forster Professor in the School of Historical, Philosophical, and Religious Studies and director of strategic initiatives in the Center for the Study of Religion and Conflict at Arizona State University. She holds degrees in religious studies from the University of Virginia and in English from Yale. Her work focuses on religion and American literature and the arts; gender, race and sexuality in American religious history; and the relationship between religion and the secular in American law, culture, and public life. Hurst Visiting Professors Series. Department of English.
Washington University, Duncker Hall, Hurst Lounge (Room 201)

21 MARCH  |  3:30 PM
Science in the Public Square: Conevery Bolton Valencius
CONEVERY BOLTON VALENCIUS, professor of history, Boston College. What do the New Madrid earthquakes have to do with oil and gas? Fracking, earthquakes and public science. Will fracking cause a Big One along the New Madrid fault that will break the U.S. in two? NO! But many scientific studies have shown connections between activities related to fracking and thousands of recent earthquakes in normally quiet parts of the U.S. In this talk, historian of science Conevery Bolton Valencius digs into the challenges that surround public discussion of science connecting earthquakes to oil and gas development. Economic and political pressures, scientific ways of talking about uncertainty and probability, and even alarmism related to past earthquakes have made it hard for local communities who have experienced earthquakes during the shale boom to figure out what was happening to them. These challenges matter to people far from fracking rigs: Knowing what to do about human-caused earthquakes is vital to our continuing energy choices and our efforts to fight the crisis of climate change. Reception to follow in the Goldberg Formal Lounge. Incubator for Transdisciplinary Futures.
Washington University, Danforth University Center, Room 276

21 MARCH  |  4 PM
What Monuments for a Modern Century? Italian Colonial Arches in Africa
FRANCESCO DE ANGELIS, professor of art history and archaeology, Columbia University.
Monumental arches erected in Somalia and Libya in the 1920s and ’30s conspicuously embodied Italy’s claims to a special relationship with the glories of the Roman empire. Yet, along with examples that more closely conformed to classical or neoclassical paradigms, there were others whose design bore little resemblance to conventional models. Instead, their architectural language, which often incorporated local vernacular features, testified to the intensive engagement of the arches’ designers with the challenges of modernity and modernism. This talk will present these arches and discuss Italy’s complex and fraught relationship to both its classical past and its short-lived colonial present in the 20th century. Department of Classics.
Washington University, Steinberg Auditorium

21 MARCH  |  5 PM
Insurgent Literacy on the Aymara Altiplano: Following the Paper Trails
BROOKE LARSON (Stony Brook University) is a leading history scholar focusing on racial formations in postcolonial Latin American history, particularly in Bolivia. Larson is author of The Lettered Indian: Race, Nation, and Indigenous Education in Bolivia, which maps the moral dilemmas and political stakes involved in the protracted struggle over Indian literacy and schooling in the Bolivian Andes. Department of Romance Languages and Literatures.
Washington University, Seigle Hall, Room 208

21 MARCH  |  5:30 PM
Author Megan Kamalei Kakimoto and Editor Callie Garnett
Author Megan Kamalei Kakimoto will give a reading from her debut short story collection, Every Drop is a Man’s Nightmare, and then discuss the process of editing and publishing the book with editorial director at Bloomsbury Publishing Callie Garnett. Center for Literary Arts.
Washington University, Umrath Hall, Umrath Lounge

22–23 MARCH  |  7:30 PM
2024 MFA Student Dance Concert
Join us for our seventh MFA Dance Concert featuring the works of our MFA candidates, Caroline Gonsalves Bertho, Emily Duggins Ehling and Amarnath Ghosh. As part of their final project, each of these artists will premiere an original piece featuring undergraduate, local and global dancers that showcases their diverse approaches to contemporary dance-making. Witness explorations of digital liveness, an embodied response to poetry and a reimagining of Rabindranath Tagore’s collection of songs, Seasons of Life. Artistic direction is by Elinor Harrison. Performing Arts Department.
Washington University, Edison Theatre

22–24 MARCH
2024 STL African Film Festival
The Department in African & African American Studies, Film & Media Studies and the African Students Association partner to present the African Film Festival to the Washington University and larger St. Louis communities. The festival showcases recent films that have fared well at international festivals.
Washington University, Brown 100

22 MARCH  |  8 PM 
Chinese-language Tour of Special Exhibitions
线上中文美术导览: 春季特展 
邀请您来和艺术史暨考古学系博士生戴悦于线上共同欣赏Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum本期展览《Kahlil Robert Irving: Archaeology of the Present》和《Santiago Sierra: 52 Canvases Exposed to Mexico City’s Air》。来一起探索这两位当代艺术家对现今生活物质维度的诠释,例如空气污染残留的粒子和都市废弃物的景观。 
欲参加者,请提前预约报名。
Student educator Yue Dai, PhD student in the Department of Art History & Archaeology, Washington University, leads an online tour of this season’s exhibitions Kahlil Robert Irving: Archaeology of the Present and Santiago Sierra: 52 Canvases Exposed to Mexico City’s Air. Participants will explore how both artists engage with the materiality of contemporary life, from the physical residue of air pollution to the sculptural topography of urban refuse. Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum.
VIRTUAL — RSVP

23 MARCH  |  2 PM 
Special Exhibitions
Student educators lead interactive tours of this season’s exhibitions Kahlil Robert Irving: Archaeology of the Present and Santiago Sierra: 52 Canvases Exposed to Mexico City’s Air. Through guided discussion, participants will explore how both artists engage with the materiality of contemporary life from the physical residue of air pollution to the sculptural topography of urban refuse. Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum.
Washington University, Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum

23 MARCH  |  2:15 PM 
Curator Chat on ‘Gateway to the East Exhibition’
Join us for an afternoon chat to find out more about the Gateway to the East: China at the 1904 St. Louis World’s Fair exhibition. Washington University Curator of Local History Miranda Rectenwald will lead informal tours and answer questions. University Libraries.
Washington University, Olin Library, Ginkgo Reading Room

24 MARCH  |  2 PM
The Sea and the Overseas: Matisse, Africa, Polynesia
The sea has long been associated with the dream of voyages to distant lands. Alastair Wright, associate professor in history of art at the University of Oxford, will discuss what Matisse’s depictions of water tell us about his encounters with the cultures of Africa and Polynesia, encounters that took place within the framework of French colonialism. Wright will look at a range of Matisse’s work, from his early Fauve years to the cut-outs created towards the end of his life, to reveal how myths of the exotic motivated his response to the art and geography of the overseas. Department of Art History and Archaeology and Saint Louis Art Museum.
Saint Louis Art Museum, Farrell Auditorium, 1 Fine Arts Dr, St. Louis, 63110

25 MARCH  |  12 PM
A Masterclass with Joyce Yang, piano
This masterclass will feature students from the Department of Music in performance, guided by Grammy-nominated pianist Joyce Yang. In the last decade, Yang has blossomed into an “astonishing artist” (Neue Zürcher Zeitung), showcasing her colorful musical personality in solo recitals and collaborations with the world’s top orchestras and chamber musicians through more than 1,000 debuts and re-engagements. She received the 2010 Avery Fisher Career Grant and earned her first Grammy nomination (Best Chamber Music/Small Ensemble Performance) for her recording of Franck, Kurtág, Previn & Schumann with violinist Augustin Hadelich. She served as the guest artistic director for the Laguna Beach Music Festival in California, curating concerts that explore the “art-inspires-art” concept – highlighting the relationship between music and dance while simultaneously curating outreach activities to young students. Yang appears in the film In the Heart of Music, a documentary about the 2005 Van Cliburn International Piano Competition. She is a Steinway artist. Department of Music. 
Washington University, 560 Music Center, E. Desmond Lee Concert Hall

25 MARCH  |  4:30 PM
Capitalist Humanitarianism: A Dialogue on Labor, Loss and Religion
In her recent book Capitalist Humanitarianism, religious studies scholar Lucia Hulsether combines historical accounts, ethnographic research and personal narrative to critically interrogate how global economic systems have absorbed critiques of capitalism in recent decades. Refuting the claim that movements such as “fair trade” or “ethical investing” exemplify a progressive approach to corporate humanitarianism, her work traverses the Americas to identify and explore how economic elites have repackaged criticisms of neoliberalism from the Left in the service of capitalist expansion and the ways in which these projects compromise, rather than further, efforts at indigenous self-determination, feminist solidarity and racial justice. Hulsether will discuss her book and the ethical commitments that inform her research and the possibilities of what it means to “write a history of the impossible.” Hulsether, assistant professor of religious studies at Skidmore College, will offer a talk on her book, which will be followed by a discussion with Cody Musselman and Eric Stephen, both postdoctoral fellows with the John C. Danforth Center on Religion and Politics. Danforth Center on Religion and Politics.
Washington University, Women’s Building Formal Lounge

26 MARCH  |  6 PM
Mnemonic Hybrids in a Hybrid Regime: Remembering the Soviet Past in Putin’s Russia
SERGEY TOYMENTSEV, is an assistant professor at Saint Louis University in the Department of Languages, Literatures and Cultures. Many scholars argue that a key feature of Putin’s Russia is the re-legitimization of the Soviet past, especially the glorification of successes including the victory in the Second World War. One consequence of this, they contend, is the prevention of full democratization. Sergey Toymentsev, on the contrary, argues that the memorialization of the Soviet past is much more complex, with traumatic facts such as the gulag not being suppressed, with the result that the past is both condemned and glorified at the same time. Toymentsev will examine the ambivalent nature of the memorialization of the Soviet past in a range of media, including history textbooks, films, television programs and novels, and concludes that the contradictory attitude to the Soviet past is entirely in step with the hybrid nature of the current regime. Program in Global Studies.
Washington University, Eads Hall, Room 215

26 MARCH  |  8 PM
Camille T. Dungy - Craft Talk
CAMILLE T. DUNGY is the author of four collections of poetry, most recently Trophic Cascade, winner of the Colorado Book Award. She is also the author of the essay collections Soil: The Story of a Black Mother’s Garden and Guidebook to Relative Strangers: Journeys into Race, Motherhood and History, a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. A 2019 Guggenheim Fellow, her honors include NEA Fellowships in poetry (2003) and prose (2018), an American Book Award, two NAACP Image Award nominations, and two Hurston/Wright Legacy Award nominations. She is University Distinguished Professor at Colorado State University. Hurst Visiting Professors Series, Department of English.
Washington University, Duncker Hall, Hurst Lounge (Room 201)

28 MARCH  |  8 PM
Camille T. Dungy - Reading
CAMILLE T. DUNGY is the author of four collections of poetry, most recently Trophic Cascade, winner of the Colorado Book Award. She is also the author of the essay collections Soil: The Story of a Black Mother’s Garden and Guidebook to Relative Strangers: Journeys into Race, Motherhood and History, a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. A 2019 Guggenheim Fellow, her honors include NEA Fellowships in poetry (2003) and prose (2018), an American Book Award, two NAACP Image Award nominations, and two Hurston/Wright Legacy Award nominations. She is University Distinguished Professor at Colorado State University. Hurst Visiting Professors Series, Department of English.
Washington University, Duncker Hall, Hurst Lounge (Room 201)

27 MARCH  |  3 PM
Virtual Book Club: Margaret the First
Written by Washington University professor Danielle Dutton, this novel explores the life of Margaret the First, an unconventional 17th-century duchess. The eccentric Margaret wrote and published volumes of poems, philosophy and feminist plays at a time when being a writer was not an option open to women. After the English Civil War, her work earned her both fame and infamy in England: At the dawn of daily newspapers, she was “Mad Madge,” an original tabloid celebrity. Yet Margaret was also the first woman to be invited to the Royal Society of London. Book club will begin with a showcase of 17th-century books, followed by a discussion of the novel. University Libraries.
VIRTUAL - RSVP

27 MARCH  |  5 PM
Humanitarian Danger and Palestinian Life in Gaza
ILANA FELDMAN, cultural anthropologist and historian, George Washington University. This talk will explore the multiple forms of humanitarian danger that are confronting Palestinians in the Gaza Strip. The massive humanitarian crisis caused by Israeli bombardment and siege of Gaza is a clear danger. The healthcare system has been decimated by attack, starvation is looming as a product of the restriction on entry of food and fuel, the vast majority of the population has been displaced, and a significant portion of its buildings (both public buildings and homes) are destroyed or damaged. It is only possible to understand, and respond to, this overwhelming threat by also understanding how “humanitarianization” is repeatedly used as a weapon against Palestinians. The talk will situate today’s humanitarian dangers within a longer historical context in which Gazans have repeatedly confronted such dynamics. Department of Anthropology.
Washington University, Seigle Hall, Room L006

30 MARCH  |  1 PM 
Tour de Museo en Español
JOSÉ GARZA, coordinador de programas académicos del museo, los invitan a un tour en español de la exhibición especial Santiago Sierra: 52 Canvases Exposed to Mexico City’s Air y obras de arte seleccionadas en la colección permanente. Durante el tour, sentirse libre a compatir sus observaciones e interpretaciones. Este programa se ofrece en colaboración con Latinx Arts Network STL. Obtenga más información sobre esta organización aquí. Gratis y abierto al público; se recomiende registro. 
Join José Garza, museum academic programs coordinator, for a Spanish-language tour of the special exhibition Santiago Sierra: 52 Canvases Exposed to Mexico City’s Air and selected artworks in the permanent collection. The interactive tour will encourage visitors to share observations and interpretations. RSVP required; see website. Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum.
Washington University, Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum

St. Louis Community Events

1–31 MARCH
See STL Walking Tours
See STL’s fun and creative tours mix engaging storytelling and a deep well of
historical knowledge with an infectious enthusiasm for the exciting changes the city is
currently undergoing. Tours are two hours in length and are wheelchair accessible. $15–$20.
Tour starting/ending points are included in your booking details. Missouri Historical Society.
2 pm, Mar. 1: Gay Liberation in the Gateway City; 10am, Mar. 2: Cherokee Street; 1pm, Mar. 2: Urban Renewal; 12pm, Mar. 3: Soulard North and LaSalle Park; 11am, Mar. 8: Laclede’s Landing; 10am, Mar. 9: Downtown Origins; 2pm, Mar. 15: Cherokee Street; 10am, Mar. 16: Gay Liberation in the Gateway City; 10am, Mar. 16: Dogtown; 1pm, Mar. 16: Dogtown; 11am, Mar. 17: Tower Grove; 10am, Mar. 22: Downtown Origins; 10am, Mar. 23: Laclede’s Landing; 10am, Mar. 24: Dogtown; 1pm, Mar. 24: Soulard North and LaSalle Park; 2pm, Mar. 29: Gay Liberations in the Gateway City; 10am, Mar. 30: Cherokee Street; 10am, Mar. 31: Dogtown

1 MARCH  |  7 PM 
C.J. Box, Three-Inch Teeth (Author Talk)
C.J. BOX returns with a new thriller in his bestselling series starring Wyoming game warden Joe Pickett. In Three-Inch Teeth, Joe faces two different kinds of rampaging beasts — one animal, one human. A rogue grizzly bear has gone on a deadly rampage. At the same time, Dallas Cates is released from prison with a special list tattooed on his skin. He wants revenge on the people who sent him away, and both Nate Romanowski and Joe Pickett are on it. Box is the author of 24 Joe Pickett novels, eight stand-alone novels and a story collection. He has won the Edgar, Anthony, Macavity, Gumshoe and two Barry awards, as well as the French Prix Calibre .38, the Western Heritage Award for Literature, and two Spur Awards. St. Louis County Library.
Ethical Society of St. Louis, 9001 Clayton Road, Saint Louis 63117

2 MARCH  |  11 AM
NiNi Harris, Black St. Louis (Author Talk)
Join us as local author NiNi Harris discusses her newest book, Black St. Louis. St. Louis Public Library.
St. Louis Public Library — Carondelet Library, 6800 Michigan Ave., St. Louis, 63111

2 MARCH  |  12 PM 
Soldiers Memorial and Surroundings
This guided outdoor tour explores the history, architecture, relief imagery, monuments and statues of both Soldiers Memorial and the Court of Honor. It also highlights many neighboring historic buildings. Missouri Historical Society.
Soldiers Memorial, Court of Honor, 1315 Chestnut St., St. Louis, 63103

2 MARCH  |  1 PM
St. Louis in Service Exhibit Tours
This guided tour introduces you to artifacts, places and stories of individuals featured in the galleries at Soldiers Memorial. Missouri Historical Society.
Soldiers Memorial, Court of Honor, 1315 Chestnut St., St. Louis, 63103

2 MARCH  |  2 PM
Vietnam: At War and At Home Exhibit Tours
This guided tour walks you through the exhibit, exploring the Vietnam War’s origins, evolution and legacy. The exhibit presents a diverse and holistic snapshot of the turbulent times in Vietnam, America and the St. Louis region. Missouri Historical Society.
Soldiers Memorial, Court of Honor, 1315 Chestnut St., St. Louis, 63103

5 MARCH  |  7 PM 
Diane Seuss, Modern Poetry (Author Talk)
DIANE SEUSS will be in conversation with Jane Hilberry, award-winning poet and professor of creativity and innovation at Colorado College. Seuss’ latest collection takes its title, Modern Poetry, from the first textbook Seuss encountered as a child and the first poetry course she took in college, as an enrapt but ill-equipped student, one who felt poetry was beyond her reach. Many of the poems make use of the forms and terms of musical and poetic craft — ballad, fugue, aria, refrain, coda — and contend with the works of writers overrepresented in textbooks and anthologies and those too often underrepresented. Seuss provides an account of her picaresque years and their uncertainties, and in the process, she enters the realm between Modernism and Romanticism, between romance and objectivity, with Keats as ghost, lover and interlocutor. Seuss is the author of five previous poetry collections, including frank: sonnets, winner of the Pulitzer Prize, National Book Critics Circle Award, Los Angeles Times Book Prize and PEN/Voelcker Award. RSVP requested; see website. Left Bank Books.
VIRTUAL

6 MARCH  |  7 PM 
David Finkel, An American Dreamer: Life in a Divided Country (Author Talk)
Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist David Finkel presents a powerful account of one man navigating the deep divisions in America today. Brent Cummings is an Iraq war veteran, raised to believe in a vision of America that values fairness and respect for others, but now, too often, experiencing the anger and confusion sweeping through his beloved country. As this powerful book begins, Cummings finds himself coping with the feeling that the country he loves is fracturing in front of his eyes. An Iraq war veteran, raised to believe in a vision of America that values fairness, honesty and respect for others, Cummings is increasingly surprised by the behavior and beliefs of others, and engulfed by the fear, anger and confusion that is sweeping through his beloved country as he tries to hold on to his values and his hope for America's future. Finkel, known for his unique, in-depth reporting, spent 14 years deep inside Brent Cummings’ world to create this intimate portrait of a man’s life, community and quest for connection. Finkel is an editor and writer at The Washington Post. He won the Pulitzer Prize for Explanatory Reporting. A MacArthur Fellowship recipient, he is the author of Thank You for Your Service and The Good Soldiers. St. Louis County Library.
The J, 2 Millstone Campus Drive, St. Louis 63146

6 MARCH  |  7 PM 
Eric von Schrader, A Universe Revealed (Author Talk)
St. Louis-raised author, documentarian and television producer Eric von Schrader will discuss book 3 in the Intersecting Worlds trilogy, A Universe Revealed. A secret makes you play its game. And when you play it, the secret wins. Always. How do you keep the biggest secret in history, especially when a master spy is snooping around? In A Universe Revealed, Diyami Red Hawk is pursuing a sacred mission to build a new Native American city at the ancient site of Cahokia. But his success is based on a lie. If anyone finds out, will his project come crashing down? For years, Jim Collins, a financial genius and a superb poker player, has been haunted by the mystery of his father, who was “very famous, but you’ll never find anyone who has heard of him.” When he meets Billy and Carol Boustany, he feels hope for the first time. They introduce him to Diyami, who desperately needs his strategic wisdom when an old adversary re-emerges with new threats. Together, they all come up with a plan to defeat the secrets, bringing the Intersecting Worlds trilogy to an astounding conclusion.
RSVP requested; see website. Left Bank Books.
Left Bank Books, 399 N Euclid Ave, St. Louis 63108

7 MARCH  |  7 PM
Ariel Lawhon and Katherine Reay, The Frozen River and The Berlin Letters (Author Talk)
ARIEL LAWHON and KATHERINE REAY discuss their genre-bending historical thrillers. Lawhon’s The Frozen River is a gripping mystery inspired by the life and diary of Martha Ballard, a renowned 18th-century midwife who investigates a shocking murder. Reay’s The Berlin Letters presents an unforgettable tale of the Cold War and a brilliant CIA code breaker attempting to free her father from an East Berlin prison. St. Louis County Library.
St. Louis County Library — Grant’s View Branch, 9700 Musick Rd., St. Louis, 63123

8 MARCH  |  10 AM
The Automotive History of St. Louis
Presented by Aging Ahead, Dr. Thomas Eysell, author of They Will Run: The Golden Age of the Automobile in St. Louis, will speak about how St. Louis was home to many firsts in the automobile industry and over 40 automobile manufacturers during the early 20th century. This program is followed by a healthy lunch. St. Louis County Library.
St. Louis County Library — Lewis & Clark Branch, 9909 Lewis-Clark Blvd., St. Louis, 63136-5322

9 MARCH  |  11 AM 
Artist Talk: Paul Chan
PAUL CHAN and Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis curator Pavel Pyś will be in conversation about the artist’s exhibition Breathers on the occasion of its opening at CAM. RSVP requested; see website. Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis.
Contemporary Art Museum St. Louis, 3750 Washington Boulevard, St. Louis 63108

9 MARCH  |  11 AM 
Shannon Lee, Be Water, My Friend (Author Talk)
Join us for a morning of self-reflection and self-healing with Shannon Lee hosted by the Very Asian Foundation and the Bruce Lee Foundation. There will be a signing line before the excerpt reading and discussion for guests to get their books personalized. Shannon Lee is the chair of the Bruce Lee Foundation, the CEO and owner of the Bruce Lee Family Companies and the daughter of the legendary martial artist and cultural icon Bruce Lee. Shannon’s overall mission is to provide access to her father’s wisdom and practices through education and entertainment and be a cause of healing and unity in the world. She is the creator of Camp Bruce Lee and other programs and community initiatives through the Bruce Lee Foundation, focusing on youth mental wellness and community healing through the legacy and mind, body, spirit teachings of her father Bruce Lee. Her first book, Be Water, My Friend, offers insight into how to use her father’s philosophies toward a more fluid, peaceful and fulfilling life. RSVP required; see website. Left Bank Books.
Duane Reed Gallery, 4729 McPherson Avenue, St. Louis, 63108

9 MARCH  |  1 PM
New to St. Louis: STL 101
New to St. Louis: STL 101 is a true insider opportunity — to get out and explore St. Louis’ streets, get acquainted with its landmarks (both well known and under the radar), find the best toasted ravioli in town, get to know St. Louisans who are making a difference in their community, meet fellow transplants and hear from experts in St. Louis history. This half-day experience presented by the Missouri Historical Society is designed to get you out and about, in the know and up to speed on where St. Louis has been, what’s happening now and where we’re going in the years ahead. The program features a wonderful talk to start the day, a guided bus tour and concludes with a Happy Hour back at the Missouri History Museum. It’s open to individuals looking to get to know St. Louis better as well as companies looking to book one or more of their employees into the experience. $60. Missouri Historical Society.
Missouri History Museum, 5700 Lindell Blvd., St. Louis, 63112

11, 26, 27 MARCH  |  2 PM
Noteworthy and Notorious Women
In celebration of Women’s History Month, learn about Virginia Minor, Getty Cori and many other women who left their mark on history and made their final rest at Bellefontaine Cemetery. St. Louis County Library.
2 pm, Mon., March 11 – Daniel Boone Branch, 300 Clarkson Rd., Ellisville, 63011
7 pm, Tues., March 26 – Lewis & Clark Branch, 9909 Lewis-Clark Blvd., St. Louis, 63136
7 pm, Wed., March 27 – Thornhill Branch, 12863 Willowyck Dr., St. Louis, 63146

12 MARCH  |  11 AM 
The Remarkable Eleanor Roosevelt with Bev Schuetz
BEV SCHUETZ will dive deep into the life and lasting influence of Eleanor Roosevelt, who overcame countless challenges and emerged as a beloved leader and extraordinary feminist, widely recognized for her significant impact in the realms of civil rights, housing and employment. Missouri Historical Society.
Missouri History Museum, Lee Auditorium, 5700 Lindell Blvd., 63112

12 MARCH  |  6 PM 
‘Four Winters’: Jewish Women’s Armed Resistance During the Holocaust Screening & Discussion
Join us for an exclusive screening that challenges prevailing myths of Jewish passivity. Through gripping accounts and archival footage, “Four Winters” unveils the courageous acts of Jews who defied the odds, escaping to the forests of Eastern Europe, Ukraine, and Belarus. There, they forged alliances and formed partisan brigades to confront the relentless advance of Nazis and their collaborators. In honor of women’s history month, don’t miss this transformative cinematic experience that amplifies many female voices long overlooked by history. Award-winning filmmaker Julia Mintz will participate in an intimate talkback post viewing. St. Louis Kaplan Feldman Holocaust Museum.
St. Louis Kaplan Feldman Holocaust Museum, 36 Millstone Campus Dr., St. Louis, 63146

13 MARCH  |  6 PM 
Diana Khoi Nguyen & Cindy Juyoung Ok, Root Fractures: Poems and Ward Toward (Author Talk)
DIANA KHOI NGUYEN and CINDY JUYOUNG are celebrated rising stars in the world of poetry: Nguyen is a National Book Award finalist, and Ok won the Yale Younger Poets Prize. Nguyen’s second poetry collection, Root Fractures, is a haunting of a family’s past upon its present and a frank reckoning with how loss and displacement transform mothers and daughters across generations. In the 118th volume of the Yale Series of Younger Poets, Ok moves assuredly between spaces — from the psych ward to a prison cell, from divided countries to hospice wards. She plumbs these institutions of constraint, ward to ward and the role of each reality's language, word to word, as she uncovers fractured private codes and shares them in argument, song and prayer. Left Bank Books.
Left Bank Books, 399 N. Euclid Ave, St. Louis, 63108

14 & 15 MARCH  |  6 PM
Reel Politics: Action Films of the ’80s
Explore the intersection of American politics and cinematic escapism as we delve into the thrilling world of macho heroes and explosive blockbusters. We will analyze how the political landscape of the 1980s left an indelible mark on the adrenaline-pumping narratives and iconic characters that defined this golden era of action cinema. RSVP required; see website. St. Louis County Library.
6 pm, Thurs., March 14 – Rock Road Branch, 10267 St. Charles Rock Rd., St. Ann, 63074
2 pm, Fri., March 15 – Daniel Boone Branch, 300 Clarkson Rd., Ellisville, 63011

15 MARCH  |  6 PM
If It Wasn’t for the Women: Navigating Memory
This year’s panel discussion celebrating women of color in the arts will explore memory. Artists Alayna N. Pernell, Marina Peng and Allena Marie Brazier will discuss how their multidisciplinary practices emerge from photography and use memories as vehicles for introspection, healing and advocacy. The artists identify, reflect and challenge systemic issues that shape their identities. The conversation will be moderated by Justice Henderson, the 2023–25 Romare Bearden Graduate Museum Fellow. Saint Louis Art Museum.
Saint Louis Art Museum, Farrell Auditorium, 1 Fine Arts Dr., St. Louis, 63110

19 MARCH–7 APRIL
August: Osage County
This Pulitzer Prize– and Tony Award–winning family drama paints a stark and often unflattering picture of the Midwestern family. In this tableau: the pill-popping and manipulative matriarch, a vanished patriarch and three daughters with secrets of their own. Familial tensions rise when all are called back to the family home in Oklahoma. Equal parts heartfelt and heart-wrenching, this story gives an in-depth look at what it takes to keep a family together. Post-show discussions following the performances on Sat., March 30 and Wed., April 3. $30-$90. Repertory Theatre St. Louis.
Loretto-Hilton Center, Mainstage, 130 Edgar Rd., Webster Groves, 63119

20 & 27 MARCH 
Women in the Archive
In celebration of Women’s History Month, dive into the untold stories of remarkable women through short vignettes centered around meaningful objects, presented by Elizabeth Eikmann, PhD. Bring your own piece of women’s history, whether a family heirloom or personal memento, and join the discussion on preserving and recovering the often-overlooked narratives of women’s lives. RSVP required; see website. St. Louis County Library.
10 am, Wed., March 20 – Weber Road Branch, 4444 Weber Rd., St. Louis, 63123
6:30 pm, Wed., March 27 – Prairie Commons Branch, 915 Utz Ln., Hazelwood, 63042

20 MARCH  |  7 PM
Chris Bohjalian, The Princess of Las Vegas (Author Talk)
Author of The Flight Attendant, Chris Bohjalian’s latest novel is a twisting tale of identity and obsession on the Las Vegas strip. Crissy Dowling passes her days by the pool in a private cabana, and each evening she transforms into a Princess, performing her musical cabaret inspired by the late Diana Spencer. When the owner of the Buckingham Palace Casino is murdered, Crissy’s kingdom comes crashing down. St. Louis County Library.
The J, 2 Millstone Campus Drive, St. Louis 63146

21 MARCH  |  2 PM
James Hemings: Ghost in America’s Kitchen
Using library resources, we will explore the short life and impact on American cuisine by James Hemings, the enslaved, French-trained chef of Thomas Jefferson. RSVP required; see website. St. Louis County Library.
St. Louis County Library — Cliff Cave Branch, 5430 Telegraphy Rd., St. Louis, 63129-3556

21 MARCH  |  4 PM
American Sign Language Tour: Coloring STL
St. Louis’ history, industries, builders, designers and even geography have all given our city a built environment that looks unlike any other place in the world. St. Louis buildings of every era, shape and size have fascinating stories to tell, colored by the history of the people who lived here. In this interactive tour, we will get to know St. Louis through its architecture. Groups will participate in activities and dialogue as they learn about the defining events and characteristics of residential, commercial and monumental structures that have shaped St. Louis’ built environment. American Sign Language (ASL) tours at the Missouri History Museum are for visitors who are Deaf or hard of hearing. Individuals or groups will enjoy a 45-minute guided tour led by specially trained staff, volunteers and an ASL interpreter in select galleries at the Missouri History Museum. These quarterly tours can accommodate up to 10 visitors and are free of charge. RSVP required; see website. Missouri Historical Society.
Missouri History Museum, 5700 Lindell Blvd., 63112

21 MARCH  |  5 PM
Black Women in Leadership
More Black women than ever are serving in positions of leadership from government to corporate business and from higher education to nonprofit sectors. Join us to hear from a panel of women who are blazing trails in our region and learn about their personal experiences growing into leadership, the challenges they’ve faced and their visions for the future of our region. This program is presented in collaboration with the Gateway (IL) and Archway (MO) chapters of The Links, Incorporated. Missouri Historical Society.
Missouri History Museum, Lee Auditorium and MacDermott Grand Hall, 5700 Lindell Blvd., St. Louis, 63112

21 MARCH  |  7 PM 
Sarah McCammon with STLPR’s Jason Rosenbaum, Exvangelicals (Author Talk)
SARAH MCCAMMON, national political correspondent for NPR and cohost of The NPR Politics Podcast, will discuss her highly anticipated first book, The Exvangelicals: Loving, Living, and Leaving the White Evangelical Church. Part memoir, part investigative journalism, this is the first definitive book that names and describes the post-evangelical movement: identifying its origins, telling the stories of its members and examining its vast cultural, social, and political impact. McCammon will be in conversation with Jason Rosenbaum, St. Louis Public Radio politics correspondent and co-host of Politically Speaking. St. Louis Public Radio and Left Bank Books.
St. Louis Public Radio, 3651 Olive St., St. Louis, 63108

21 MARCH  |  7 PM
Tarryn Fisher, Good Half Gone (Author Talk)
Iris narrowly escaped her twin sister’s fate as a teen: kidnapped and long gone before the cops agreed to investigate. Now an adult, Iris wants one thing — proof. If the police still won’t help, she will find it her own way: by interning at the isolated Shoal Island Hospital for the criminally insane. Iris soon realizes that something even more sinister is simmering beneath the surface of the Shoal, and that the patients aren’t the only ones being observed. St. Louis County Library.
The J’s Staenberg Family Complex, Mirowitz Performing Arts Center, 2 Millstone Campus Drive, St. Louis, 63146

22 MARCH  |  2 PM
Art HERstory: Anna Atkins
In celebration of Women’s History Month, learn about Anna Atkins — an English botanist and photographer who is often considered the first person to publish a book illustrated with photographic images — and create your own art inspired by her work. RSVP requested; see website. St. Louis County Library.
St. Louis County Library — Samuel C. Sachs Branch, 16400 Burkhardt Pl., Chesterfield, 63017

22 MARCH  |  7 PM
HEARD
Alarm Will Sound returns to Missouri with HEARD, a program that intertwines music and storytelling to share how composers convey their personal narratives through music. This performance also highlights the breadth of Alarm Will Sound’s stylistic range and musical omnivorousness with works ranging from Tania León’s Toque, inspired by Cuban dance, to Hanabi by Alarm Will Sound members Chris Thompson and Miles Brown, a piece inspired by electronic dance music and drum line. Alarm Will Sound will be joined by special guests, including Bora Yoon for her work Casual Miracles and Damon Davis for the premiere of an excerpt from his science-fiction opera Ligeia Mare. Also on the program is Līlā by Texu Kim, a work supported by the Barlow Prize and written for AWS, the London Sinfonietta, the Oakland Symphony Orchestra and the St. Paul Chamber Orchestra. 
Kirkwood Performing Arts Center, 210 East Monroe Ave., Kirkwood, 63122

23 MARCH  |  9 AM 
Discovery Tour: Subterranean St. Louis
Join us as we explore the hidden world beneath our city. Meet with experts in urban archaeology, geology and even paleontology who are actively working throughout St. Louis, connecting deep history with the present. Go on a fossil hunt at the Old Cathedral and eat lunch in a historic beer cave. Missouri Historical Society.
Missouri History Museum, 5700 Lindell Blvd., St. Louis, 63112

23 MARCH  |  11 AM
The Extraordinary Art and Life of Michelina Wautier
For this year’s annual Mary Strauss Women in the Arts Lecture, art historian Betsy Wieseman will focus on the scholarly sleuthing that has — at long last — returned Michelina Wautier’s creations to their rightful author. Active in the court city of Brussels, Wautier (1604–89) was an artist of exceptional versatility, producing portraits, genre scenes, allegories and still lifes as well as religious and mythological scenes. Paradoxically, her command of a broad stylistic and thematic range resulted over time in many of her paintings being attributed to various other (male) artists. Only in this century have art historians begun to fully appreciate Wautier’s audacious talent. Wieseman is curator and head of the department of Northern European paintings at the National Gallery of Art. Saint Louis Art Museum.
Saint Louis Art Museum, Farrell Auditorium, 1 Fine Arts Dr, St. Louis, 63110

26 MARCH  |  6 PM
StitchCast Studio LIVE!
Story Stitchers artists and guest artists will round out each presentation with live art interludes. Youth, ages 16–25 years old, discuss current topics in live podcast recordings on stage. Learn about the community through the words of young leaders. Saint Louis Story Stitchers.
High Low, Listening Room, 3301 Washington Ave, St. Louis 63103

27 MARCH  |  3:30 PM
“With,” Not “On,” the Community: Opportunities and Challenges for Digital Public Humanities
ROOPIKA RISAM is an associate professor of film and media studies and of comparative literature at Dartmouth, where she is part of the Digital Humanities and Social Engagement Cluster. Risam’s research interests lie at the intersections of postcolonial and African diaspora studies, critical university studies and digital humanities. Her recent work includes New Digital Worlds: Postcolonial Digital Humanities in Theory, Praxis, and Pedagogy (Northwestern, 2018), and she has co-edited volumes such as The Digital Black Atlantic (Minnesota, 2021) and South Asian Digital Humanities: Postcolonial Mediations Across Technology’s Cultural Canon (Routledge, 2020). Her current book project, “Insurgent Academics: A Radical Account of Public Humanities,” traces a new history of public humanities through the emergence of ethnic studies. Walter J. Ong, S.J., Center for Digital Humanities, Saint Louis University.
Saint Louis University, Pere Marquette Gallery, DuBourg Hall 240, 221 N. Grand Blvd., St. Louis, 63103

28 MARCH  |  5 PM
Just Action with Leah and Richard Rothstein
Leah and Richard Rothstein will discuss their new book Just Action, which explores the racial segregation that characterizes every metropolitan area in the U.S. and bears responsibility for our most serious social and economic problems. Progress on desegregating neighborhoods is hobbled by a national myth that residential segregation is de facto — the result of private discrimination or personal choices that do not violate constitutional rights. Building on the work of The Color of Law, a groundbreaking work exposing the racially explicit and unconstitutional government policy that is the foundation of contemporary residential segregation, Just Action describes how we can build a national movement that can remedy our unconstitutional racial landscape, starting with achievable local victories. Richard Rothstein will be joining this conversation virtually; Leah Rothstein will be presenting in person at the Missouri History Museum and will sign books after the discussion. Missouri Historical Society.
Missouri History Museum, Lee Auditorium and MacDermott Grand Hall, 5700 Lindell Blvd., St. Louis, 63112

29 MARCH  |  7 PM
Heather Gudenkauf, Every One is Watching (Author Talk)
From the author of The Overnight Guest comes a twisty locked-room thriller about a mysterious high-stakes game that proves life-threatening. Five contestants have been chosen to compete for $10 million on the game show One Lucky Winner. The catch? They will be completely isolated on luxurious estate, and none of the competitors know what (or who) to expect. When long-kept secrets begin to rise to the surface, they realize this is no longer just a reality show — someone is out for blood. The game can’t end until the world knows who the contestants really are. St. Louis County Library.
St. Louis County Library — Daniel Boone Branch, 300 Clarkson Rd., Ellisville, 63011